This Icelandic Beer Contains Whale Testicles

Staff Writer
This Icelandic Beer Contains Whale Testicles
This Icelandic Beer Contains Whale Testicles
Steðji Brewery

Not everyone will go nuts for testicle beer, but perhaps there are a few refined Nordic palettes that will enjoy it. 

There are certainly some crazy beers out there, like coconut curry from the New Belgium Brewery, or the ghost pepper beer from Twisted Pine brewing company. But this Icelandic beer really has balls (and we mean that literally). Icelandic brewery Steðji has created a seasonal beer made with smoked whale’s testicles, called Thorri beer, Hvalur 2. The beer is being made in conjunction with an Icelandic winter festival during which people eat traditional Nordic foods, like whale.

Here is an English translation of the Icelandic description of this beer on the brewery’s website:

“What makes this beer special is that, it´s ingredients is [sic] Pure icelandic water, malted barley, hops and sheep sh*t-smoked whale balls. Icelanders have used this method of smoking for centuries, so we choosed to handle the whale balls the same way before we use it in the brew. Because a lack of trees in Iceland, we use dry sheep sh*t to smoke. This gives the beer an excellent smoke tast, a smoke tast you havn´t tryed out before... The balls also gives its flavour to the beer.”

Naturally, animal rights activists are unhappy with the beer, which utilizes the meat of an endangered species.

“Reducing a beautiful, sentient whale to an ingredient on the side of a beer bottle is about as immoral and outrageous as it is possible to get,” Icelandic whaling campaign leader Vanessa Williams-Grey told The Guardian.

Regardless, if you really want to drink the beer you'll have to travel to Iceland between January 22 and February 22, because it will not be exported.

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