Top Rated Thanksgiving Turkey Recipes

Thanksgiving Turkey: Mayonnaise Roasted Turkey
Roasted turkey, brined turkey, dry-brined turkey, healthy turkey, bacon-wrapped turkey, turkey stuffed with stuffing, turkey cooked with compound butter, herbs and spices, smoked turkey, jerk turkey, barbecue turkey, paper-bag turkey, beer-can turkey, turducken, you've tried them all, and of course, you've considered tackling the risks of doing a fried turkey too. You’ve heard of every variation known to man, thought about what temperature to cook the turkey at and for how long, hoped for a moist turkey breast and oohs and ahs from your guests. But when thinking about doing something different, but perhaps not too much more difficult than your traditional Thanksgiving turkey, have you ever considered a mayonnaise-roasted Turkey?Maybe. But probably not.At least, we’ve thought about all the preparations above, but never heard of a mayonnaise-roasted turkey until one member of The Daily Meal staff Sharon Gitelle was inspired by a recipe by Amy of She Wears Many Hats. The photo looked gorgeous; the skin thin, golden and crispy, covered with herbs and healthy crust of salt and pepper. The meat in the picture pulls away from the edges of the legs, the skin is condensed all crispy and crunchy — mayo-crusted turkey skin — like some oil and egg augmented chicharrón-like Turkey gribenes.It had to be experimented with. So, inspired by She Wears Many Hats, and armed with a cause (feeding The Daily Meal’s staff during its inaugural potluck Thanksgiving) we set out undaunted by the idea of trying a first-time recipe as the central dish of a public event. After all, armed with The Daily Meal’s Guide to Thanksgiving, its survival and SOS guides, its guides to temperatures, cooking times, and emergency solutions, how could things go wrong? We used our convection oven, but you can use the turkey cooking times for a conventional oven for the recipe too.And go wrong they didn’t. The following recipe for a 16- to 18-pound turkey was a hit. It was quick. It was easy. It was messy. It was a success. And it was simple too: Mayonnaise, herbs, seasoning, and some celery and onion. That’s all!The turkey breast was as moist 15 minutes after cutting it as it was when Editorial Director Colman Andrews carved it. The skin was crunchy and delicious, and the flavor, well… you didn’t get mayonnaise, but you did get a savory herbaceousness.“Mayonnaise you might ask? Mayonnaise-roasted? That sounds outrageous!”Well, how would it sound if someone suggested they would use an egg glaze and drizzle olive oil over your Thanksgiving turkey? Pretty delicious, right? Well that’s the idea behind this turkey recipe, one that we thank Amy for inspiring and which we tweaked here and there to suit our bird, and maybe this or next Thanksgiving, yours.Arthur Bovino is The Daily Meal's executive editor. Read more articles by Arthur, reach him by email, or click here to follow Arthur on Twitter.
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If your oven fails this holiday, you can cook your turkey in the diswasher.  When and why did David first try this? In 1982, he was serving as a private chef for a family in Oslo, Norway. The group of chefs caught a 10-pound salmon — as per the request from the family to have cold poached salmon on the buffet that Sunday evening. After realizing they did not have a pot large enough to cook it in, David seasoned and wrapped the salmon and then hung it on the top rack of the dishwasher where the glasses typically go. Three cycles later, he was rewarded with a perfectly poached fish and has been experimenting ever since. For more turkey talk, head over to The Daily Meal's Guide to Thanksgiving
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"After all of the heavy eating on Thanksgiving Day, it is normal to feel full for the remaining week. But, with a bounty of leftovers, it is the perfect opportunity to feed your friends and keep the Thanksgiving entertainment going. I like to make my friends delicious Turkey BLTs with Sriracha Mayo. It is a great way to use my leftover turkey. The sandwiches aren't too heavy, so there are no flashbacks of too much stuffing and pumpkin pie."
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Prunes
I will, as I always do, cook duck for Thanksgiving. The reason is the fat. A duck may look slimmer, but when cooked it rarely dries out, while a turkey that’s leaner often does. To choose a leaner meat may be a good idea in general, but I definitely prefer something tastier. Related: A Toast of Trumpets  If you think the duck renders too much fat while baking, I suggest you spoon off the overflow for use in other treats. Potatoes fried in duck fat are heavenly and a duck-fat omelette is marvelous. When done right, duck fat even stores really well. Related: Carmelized Apple Tart  I also recommend using all the parts that come with it. The liver can be chopped up and sautéed with shallots, coriander, and cumin or seasoned with lime and cilantro for a perfect appetizer. The neck (and head and feet) and rest of the giblets make a great base for a stock (see below). This week’s recipe is my own creation, but I learned the baking method from both my mother and Elizabeth David (French Provincial Cooking, 1960). Happy Thanksgiving. — Johanna Kindvall Related: Bacon Cups 
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Kitty Kat Cook
This is not some recipe I found, it is just my personal way of marinating / seasoning any kind of meat. I use a flavor injector, an electric Roasting oven, some oven bags, foil, ties, pop-up timer and a basting brush. * I use this same seasoning for a pork roast for Christmas ;)
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Kristin
Bourbon whiskey, citrus juices and ginger ale give thanks to each other in a tall ice-filled glass.
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anon-nt9m0bju1nk1@base.google.com (Recipe Binder)
brining is key to super juicy turkey
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