Top Rated Poached Egg Recipes

Eggs in Purgatory
An idea taken straight from my Nonna's kitchen, with some modern and time-saving techniques for the not-so-skilled Italian cooks out there, this recipe is my favorite childhood breakfast (except for my dad's specialty, banana pancakes). So whether it's for breakfast-for-dinner, or you're whipping this up for Sunday brunch, the hearty Italian dish is sure to win over your audience's heart — so long as they like sauce and eggs.  Click here to see Fall in Love with Breakfast Again — at Dinner.
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4.076925
Cheese, Bacon and Wheat Germ Grits with Poached Eggs
For a Southern classic with a twist, Kretschmer has added some wheat germ to this hearty dish. Serve these grits with a mixed green salad or fruit salad for a delicious brunch, lunch or even dinner. Click Here for More Poached Egg Recipes
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4
Chorizo, Potato, and Kale Hash
By
While breakfast hashes are typically chock-full of greasy bacon or sausage and potatoes, I love making hashes using leaner chorizos, such as ground turkey or chicken chorizo. Replacing russet potatoes with yams or sweet potatoes and adding kale makes this breakfast a healthier alternative to your typical hash. You can also use this hash to make breakfast burritos and tacos, or an omelet.  — Julia Mueller This recipe is from Julia’s Let Them Eat Kale cookbook. Click here for more information on the cookbook. Click here for more kale recipes.  
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4
This California-version of eggs Benedict is from Sandi of All the Good Blog Names Are Taken.  
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4
Eggs en Meurette
What is meurette? It's a French sauce derived from sauce espagnole, a classic sauce based on a brown veal stock made with roasted veal bones. This is a simplified version for home cooks that shouldn't take too much time to prepare. See all egg recipes.
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4
Eggs Florentine with Hollandaise Sauce
Along with pancakes, waffles, French toast, omelettes, and eggs Benedict, eggs Florentine is an iconic brunch time staple. This recipe is perfect for serving a crowd on a lazy Sunday morning since there's enough sauce for eight people. See all egg recipes.
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4
Legend has it that it was at this iconic New York City steakhouse that the first order of eggs Benedict appeared. Whether or not it is the truth, the restaurant still serves the dish in full fashion, with elegant touches like caviar and a brioche bun. 
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4
This dish has the perfect balance with vegetables and meat. It takes little time to prepare, so don't fret! 
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4
For a quick and easy poached egg, try cooking it in the microwave. Make sure to use a 1100W microwave and a 16-ounce capacity microwave-safe mug or bowl.  Click here to see the Microwaved Poachd Egg (Slideshow)
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3.63158
Crock Pot Garlic Soup
Is there any single food associated with warmth, healing, and comfort more frequently than chicken soup? Moms, old wives, and the majority of culinary cultures around the world agree: Whether you're under the weather, battling the incoming winter chill, or simply feeling out of sorts, nothing else feels as restorative as a steaming bowl of the stuff. During the latest cold snap, I decided to stray from the Campbell's route and prepare Sopa de Ajo, a Basque version of chicken soup. While the Basque recipe traditionally calls for day-old-bread to give the soup some textural heft, I substituted it with potatoes to make the recipe a bit heartier and more crockpot-friendly .Click here for more of the 101 Best Slow Cooker Recipes This is the chicken soup of our collective childhood consciousness on steroids. Aside from the fact that it's perfumed with more than 40 cloves of garlic, pinches of saffron, cumin, cayenne, and paprika, it is topped with a poached egg, which, when pierced, leaks its golden yolk into the soup's depths. It's almost magical, and is virtually guaranteed to cure that cold of yours in no time at all. Click here to see Cozy Comfort Food Recipes.   
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3.25
Pane carasau, also called carta (or fogli) di musica, meaning “music paper,” is found on nearly every Sardinian table. Said to have been first made many centuries ago in the harsh, mountainous Barbagia region in east-central Sardinia, it is unleavened and crisp and parchment thin, hence its name. It can be eaten as a kind of cracker, with shards broken off the large irregular rounds in which it is baked, but it is often moistened before eating. A common way of eating pane carasau, however, is in the form of pani frattàu — almost a kind of lasagna. For more ideas, check out some of our best lasagna recipes.
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2.714285
Sultry, buttery hollandaise, crisp ham, and a yolky poached egg isn’t quite the same experience as enjoying those three things over a toasted English muffin. We think you’ll agree about them being served over fries, as well. Click  here to see 15 Over-the-Top Fry Recipes
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1.5