Top Rated Kimchi Recipes

Halmoni Dumplings
These dumplings are stuffed with zucchini, pork, tofu, cabbage, and spicy kimchi, and are a staple on the menu at Mokbar in New York City. Recipe courtesy of chef Esther Choi. 
View Recipe
5
If you think veggie burgers are bland, you have to add this to your meatless meal recipes. This recipe is courtesy of Beyond Meat
View Recipe
4.5
kimchi ramen
All you need is 5 minutes, a packet of ramen, and a few other healthy ingredients to take your package of instant ramen and totally transform it into a healthy meal.
View Recipe
4.5
Easy Kimchi Slaw
This spicy slaw is a quick-pickled version of the traditional Korean dish and gives cabbage, red bell pepper and carrots a tasty makeover. Serve this slaw as a side dish or as a topping for burgers and sandwiches.Recipe courtesy of McCormick
View Recipe
4.5
Korean Burgers With Gochugaru BBQ Sauce and Kimchi Slaw
An all-American favorite gets hit with a giant dose of umami in this recipe for Korean Burgers. Tang from the kimchi and smoke from the homemade BBQ Sauce pull it all together.Recipe courtesy of McCormick
View Recipe
4.5
Kimchi Ramen
This quick dish uses pre-prepared kimchi for a quick kick to your ramen noodles. Topped with a fried egg it’s the perfect quick weeknight meal.  ​Click here for more ramen upgrades
View Recipe
4
Daikon Radish Kimchi
Daikon radish is another common kimchi, which soaks up the marinade phenomenally well and remains addictively crisp for a few days.Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
View Recipe
4
Bulgogi Burger
Kimchi-topped bulgogi beef is a favorite Korean dish, and it’s just as good when transformed into a burger.This recipe is courtesy of Tablespoon.
View Recipe
3.5
Brisket Bulgogi Sliders with Kimchi Aïoli
These Korean-inspired sliders are popular with the beer served at 508 Gastrobrewery, a gastropub located in New York City. They were also featured at the 2012 Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival at the Grand Tasting.
View Recipe
3.333335
Portuguese Kimchi
Kimchi is a Korean pickled dish, traditionally made with cabbage and daikon radish. Try out this Portuguese take on kimchi; it’s flavored with lots of garlic and piri piri peppers, also known as bird’s eye chiles. Click Here to See More Kimchi Recipes
View Recipe
3
Spicy Kimchi Yuba “Noodles” With Poached Egg
The question of Stuart Brioza’s love of kimchi is answered with a trip up a wobbly ladder to a secret loft space turned fermentation lab above his insanely popular San Francisco restaurant, State Bird Provisions. In this crawl space, we spotted large buckets of napa cabbage and daikon radish kimchi, which the chef makes year-round using chopped-up Beausoleil oysters. “I’m a Bay Area kid, so the idea of mixing cultures comes naturally to me,” he says, sipping an espresso in the restaurant’s sunny dining room. We’re talking about the marriage of Japanese yuba—the delicate skin that forms on top of soy milk while making tofu—with Korean kimchi, a dish he has served since the early days of State Bird, and one that has become one of the restaurants’ signatures.Brioza was nice enough to slip us the recipe, and we’ve made it many times since. Whenever we can find fresh yuba, sold at Asian supermarkets, we have this relatively simple recipe top of mind. The inviting, fragile-but-chewy texture of the tofu skin and the richness of the egg yolk are beautifully contrasted with a burst of Kimchi Vinaigrette (recipe follows). It’s easy to make, but also slightly chef-y and out of the box. And if you happen to be reading this during Dungeness crab season, it’s a great addition at the end. Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
View Recipe
3
Baechu Kimchi
Napa cabbage: The granddaddy of all kimchi. This is the kimchi that people think of when they hear the word kimchi—from taco topper to the cooler case at Ralph’s. There are literally thousands of different kimchi recipes and combinations, tied to the seasons. That said, this recipe is special.Traditionally, napa kimchi is made in the late autumn (October through December) to prepare for the famously harsh Korean winter. The tradition is called kimjang, and back in the day entire communities got together to make it in large batches. We’re talking as much as 100 heads of cabbage at at time, with recipes passed down village to village, generation to generation. But you can certainly make yourself a batch any time during the year if you can find plump and healthy napa cabbage.Buying the cabbage. Look for cabbage that appears healthy and fresh; remove the outer few layers of leaves if anything is browned. At Korean markets, the peeling away of blighted leaves is often done right in the store. The remaining leaves should be tightly packed.The paste and marinade. Next make the rice flour paste (an important binder) and the marinade, which includes an essential ingredient: salted fermented shrimp called saeujeot. While many recipes callfor fish sauce, we feel the salted shrimp add a pronounced flavor that is just too good to omit. Once combined with the cabbage (don’t forget to wear gloves!) and stuffed into glass jars or plastic containers of varying sizes, the waiting game begins.Kimchi is alive and always changing. Kimchi is all about personal taste, and some like their kimchi fresh, while others like it older and funkier. Our general suggestion is to make a large batch (like 6 to 8 heads) and store it in several jars to sample after different time periods. But if you’re new to the kimchi making process, start small with the recipe here and scale up later. After 5 days, pull out a small jar and eat it wrapped in lettuce with a hunk of grilled Kalbi. After 10 days, pull another jar and place on the table with Godeungeo Gui. Keep one in the back of your refrigerator for two months and stew it down in a Kimchi Jjigae. Or, at any age, just snack on it directly from the jar. Give a jar to your best friend or boss or favorite food fan. This is a serious stocking stuffer. Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
View Recipe
2.5