Top Rated Kimchi Recipes

Gin Kimchi Cocktail
Kimchi (pickled and fermented vegetables served with Korean food) has always scared me. The flavor can be intensely pungent and the texture rather slippery. Some of the cooks in the Cyrus kitchen were pickling radishes one day, and the smell caught me off guard. At first I thought they were making kimchi, but they explained that pickled radishes, while not true kimchi, throw off an intense smell reminiscent of fermented vegetation. while the radishes smelled almost offensive, they tasted delicious. I wondered if the strong aroma and flavor might work well in a cocktail in the same way that musk is a nice undertone in cologne. This was the tasty result.  Adapted from "Artisanal Cocktails" by Scott Beattie.
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Lee Kang Hyo Bottle
Cucumber kimchi is a great example of the ying and the yang in Korean cuisine.  The coolness of the cucumbers is balanced with the spiciness of the chile powder.  The oldest references to kimchi date back about 3000 years, originally made with cabbage and beef stock.  Chile powder was added to kimchi after 1500, when the ingredient was introduced after the discovery of the New World. — Maite Gomez-Réjon.Adapted from the ArtBites tour of the UCLA Fowler Museum: Korean Food and Symbols.*Note: Pictured is one of the works of art that inspired this recipe.
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4.666665
Whole Kimchi (Tongbaechu Kimchi)
This is a traditional way to make kimchi. It not only looks quite beautiful but is great because you can pull the cabbage out and chop it to the size you’d like. You can make lovely perfectly layered squares, or chop it finely for adding to another dish. It’s up to you. Pulling it from the vat whole is … memorable, I think.Adding raw seafood, such as oysters, is common, particularly on the southern tip of South Korea, which makes sense, being near the ocean. If you decide to add seafood, because you are adding it raw and it’s going to ferment, make sure it’s fresh and of high quality. Clean it in a salt water bath and drain before using. The seafood is best added to small batches that you’ll ferment in the fridge and eat up pretty quickly. — Sharon Flynn, author of Ferment for GoodPreparation time: 2 hoursFermentation time: 3+ daysEquipment: Large crock or jar, your chosen lidding system
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4.5
kimchi ramen
All you need is 5 minutes, a packet of ramen, and a few other healthy ingredients to take your package of instant ramen and totally transform it into a healthy meal.
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4.5
Kimchi Pancakes
There’s something to be said for eating kimchi when it’s young and fresh and still a little crisp. But when your kimchi gets really funky and fermented and you’re scared of what it might do to your digestive system, that’s the best time to make these pancakes. That’s when the kimchi flavor really shine through. These pancakes are really tasty with their crispy outside and are so easy to make.These are usually made as large pancakes that are cut into smaller pieces to be shared at the table, but I find smaller ones more attractive and easier to flip.Excerpted from KOREAN FOOD MADE SIMPLE © 2016 by Judy Joo. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
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4.5
Bulgogi Burger
Kimchi-topped bulgogi beef is a favorite Korean dish, and it’s just as good when transformed into a burger.This recipe is courtesy of Tablespoon.
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4.333335
Kimchi Ramen
This quick dish uses pre-prepared kimchi for a quick kick to your ramen noodles. Topped with a fried egg it’s the perfect quick weeknight meal.  ​Click here for more ramen upgrades
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Baechu Kimchi
Napa cabbage: The granddaddy of all kimchi. This is the kimchi that people think of when they hear the word kimchi—from taco topper to the cooler case at Ralph’s. There are literally thousands of different kimchi recipes and combinations, tied to the seasons. That said, this recipe is special.Traditionally, napa kimchi is made in the late autumn (October through December) to prepare for the famously harsh Korean winter. The tradition is called kimjang, and back in the day entire communities got together to make it in large batches. We’re talking as much as 100 heads of cabbage at at time, with recipes passed down village to village, generation to generation. But you can certainly make yourself a batch any time during the year if you can find plump and healthy napa cabbage.Buying the cabbage. Look for cabbage that appears healthy and fresh; remove the outer few layers of leaves if anything is browned. At Korean markets, the peeling away of blighted leaves is often done right in the store. The remaining leaves should be tightly packed.The paste and marinade. Next make the rice flour paste (an important binder) and the marinade, which includes an essential ingredient: salted fermented shrimp called saeujeot. While many recipes callfor fish sauce, we feel the salted shrimp add a pronounced flavor that is just too good to omit. Once combined with the cabbage (don’t forget to wear gloves!) and stuffed into glass jars or plastic containers of varying sizes, the waiting game begins.Kimchi is alive and always changing. Kimchi is all about personal taste, and some like their kimchi fresh, while others like it older and funkier. Our general suggestion is to make a large batch (like 6 to 8 heads) and store it in several jars to sample after different time periods. But if you’re new to the kimchi making process, start small with the recipe here and scale up later. After 5 days, pull out a small jar and eat it wrapped in lettuce with a hunk of grilled Kalbi. After 10 days, pull another jar and place on the table with Godeungeo Gui. Keep one in the back of your refrigerator for two months and stew it down in a Kimchi Jjigae. Or, at any age, just snack on it directly from the jar. Give a jar to your best friend or boss or favorite food fan. This is a serious stocking stuffer. Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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4
Daikon Radish Kimchi
Daikon radish is another common kimchi, which soaks up the marinade phenomenally well and remains addictively crisp for a few days.Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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4
Kimchi Bokkeumbab (Kimchi Fried Rice)
Hugh Jackman provided me some inspiration for tonight's dinner, Ginger Fried Rice Korean-style, a dish he apparently loves according to People magazine (but I'm thinking the wife would probably had benefited from some kind of soup for her sudden sickness). When he was younger, his father used to do a lot of business in Korea so he was exposed to the food and fell in love with it. Enough so to become a goodwill ambassador for Seoul and a fan-favorite in Korea. Anyways, I found this article in People today and decided to change it up a little bit (adding scrambled eggs and Korea's staple food kimchi). The family loved it along with a bean sprout banchan side dish that I prepared for them. The recipe provided is my version of this delicious recipe.  This and other recipes can be found at www.oliviajasonkim.com. ^^
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3.5
Spicy Kimchi
I adapted this recipe from one I learned in a workshop at The Asian Culinary Forum in San Francisco with Huynjoo Albrecht, of CookingKorean.com. If you’ve only had commercial kimchi, which is sometimes overly salty and very spicy while lacking dimension, you’ll be surprised at the complexity of this version. Lightly fermented and spicy, to be sure, the nuances of the individual components come through in layers. If you’re worried about making it too spicy, start with less red pepper the first time you make it and see how you like it. If you have access to a Korean market, buy the medium ground Korean red pepper powder for kimchi, which usually comes in a one-pound plastic bag. Make sure that it doesn’t have salt or other additives. You may also experiment with a milder cayenne pepper; a mild ground red chile, such as New Mexico; or Aleppo pepper, a mild red pepper used in Middle Eastern cooking that has a nice fruity flavor and a similar heat level to Korean pepper. This recipe is written for kosher salt. If you’re using a finer-grained sea salt, you will need to use about 25 percent less. Adapted from "D.I.Y. Delicious" by Vanessa Barrington.  Click here to see 7 No-Cook Side Dishes.
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3.08
Portuguese Kimchi
Kimchi is a Korean pickled dish, traditionally made with cabbage and daikon radish. Try out this Portuguese take on kimchi; it’s flavored with lots of garlic and piri piri peppers, also known as bird’s eye chiles. Click Here to See More Kimchi Recipes
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