Top Rated Haddock Recipes

omelette
The omelette Arnold Bennett has been on the menu at London’s Savoy Hotel ever since the author asked the kitchen to serve him smoked haddock in omelet form sometime around the turn of the twentieth century. Today, The Savoy’s version has strayed from the original recipe (among other things, it includes garlic and thyme, and uses a mix of cheddar and Gruyère), and other variations on the formula abound. Some call for the omelet to be folded over like a classic French omelet, though the original was served open-faced. This is a reasonably simple interpretation, worked out by trial and error, which nonetheless captures what I believe to be the spirit of the original.Recipe excerpted from cookbook The British Table: A New Look at the Traditional Cooking of England, Scotland, and Wales by Colman Andrews. Click here to purchase your own copy. 
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4.5
Kedgeree
Albion is our version of a French all-day pavement café done in a British style, with an adjoining bakery and a small shop. Breakfast is served throughout the day, alongside fish and chips, half pints of prawns, mussels cooked in cider, a minimum of three different pies (often more, including delights such as cottage pie, chicken and crayfish pie and game pie), plus Irish stew, kedgeree, devilled kidneys, doorstop sandwiches, fruit jellies, puddings and crumbles. Click here to see Cook Your Way Through London.
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4.5
California Walnuts
Seasoned strips of flaky tilapia provide a tasty alternative to traditional tacos. Topped with a light, crunchy walnut slaw with sweet mango, these make the perfect meal any day of the week.This recipe is provided by California Walnuts.
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4.5
New England Seafood Chowder, Seafood Soup, Creamy Fish Chowder
Creamy New England Chowder with Fresh Fish and Mixed Seafood.
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4.5
Fish and Chips With Tartar Sauce
What can I say… a British classic, a golden-battered, "Rule, Britannia!"-warbling stalwart that is as iconically British as roast beef, plum pudding, and a surfeit of beer. It has always been on the Fortnum’s menu, and is an eternal best-seller. Here, it’s breadcrumbed, with Japanese panko, rather than battered, which gives a really crisp coating to the fish. Light, too.The chips, fat and proud, should be double-cooked, for a crisp exterior and soft centre. Always make sure you use fresh, clean oil. You can prepare everything in advance up to the last frying.Oh, and the dish is not John Bull British in origin, as you might have believed, rather a happy marriage of Jewish (Ashkenazi immigrants would sell cold fried fish on the streets of London) and French (who invented the chip as we know it). But worry not, flag-wavers… it was the British who put the two together. And the Brits who still worship at its burnished, lightly vinegared feet. — Tom Parker Bowles, author of Fortnum & Mason: The CookbookBe sure to serve your fish and chips with homemade minted peas. For the recipe, click here.
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3.57143
Use sole or flounder fillets to make this main course, too. Serve with sautéed spinach or kale on the side. The pumpkin seeds can be made ahead and stored in an airtight container at room temperature until ready to use.
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3