Top Rated Bean Sprout Recipes

Ginger Chicken Wraps
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This warm and spicy Ginger Chicken Sandwich Wraps recipe is an easy, low-fuss dish that’s perfect for lunch or dinner.
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4.5
Bibimbap
This classic recipe comes to us from NYC's The Woo, where Executive Chef Eli Martinez cooks up modern takes on iconic Korean dishes.Once you have all of the ingredients prepped, bibimbap is a fairly simple dish. We suggest making big batches of the components ahead of a dinner party or for weekday meal prep, and then assembling and cooking the dish will only take a matter of minutes.
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4.5
Recipe excerpted from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook
 In just a few decades, Thai food has grown from relative obscurity into one of the most popular cuisines on Earth. This vegetable curry has many of its classic tastes and textures.The Meat Free Monday Cookbook edited by Annie Rigg © 2016 Kyle Books, and the photographs © Tara Fisher. Hardcover edition originally published in April 2012. No images may be used, in print or electronically, without written consent from the publisher.
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4.333335
Thai food is really stepping out there for me, especially because I'm sick of my hamburgers-every-night-for-dinner routine. This was the first time I had ever tried duck, and I have to say it was amazing.    Recipe from Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders by Emeril Lagasse.
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4.333335
Gado Gado (Indonesian Cooked Vegetable Salad with Peanut Dressing)
"Gado" in Bahasa Indonesia usually means one of two things: 1) to eat something raw or 2) to eat something without rice. So important is rice in the typical Indonesian meal that one word has been set aside to designate the unusual practice of eating something without the staple crop. Since most of the vegetables in this salad are cooked, and as far as I can recall, I have never seen someone enjoy this dish with rice, it's probably safe to go with the second definition in this context. Saying something descriptive twice, though, is a way of denoting emphasis, as in, "really really." And so, in reading "gado gado," or "gado²" the translation could be roughly interpreted as "you really, really shouldn't eat this with rice." Why? Because it would be weird. This is a light and refreshing salad popular in many parts of Indonesia. I suspect it is of Javanese origin because of its notably sweet flavor profile and use of (ideally) Javanese palm sugar. No palm sugar? No problem — dark brown sugar makes a decent substitute. Same thing with the "kangkung" — it's a green leafy Chinese vegetable for which spinach is a good substitute; for those of you familiar with Malaysian cuisine, it's the vegetable that's in kangkung belacan. And if the shrimp paste has you worried, no sweat — it's not completely necessary. The most important thing to remember about this salad is that when you serve it, eat it right off the bat. Don’t let it sit, because the vegetables have a lot of water that thins out the dressing (a good thing, at first, since it's pretty thick), but after awhile... not so good. Anyway, the next time it's 100 degrees out at 100-percent humidity and hazy (normal weather in the capital, Jakarta), give this recipe a whirl. Many thanks to Zulinda Budiaman, my mother, for helping me with this recipe. Click here to see more peanut recipes. Click here to see Beyond Sriracha: Sambal Oelek.
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4
Sesame Leaf Wrap
Chef Brian Tsao’s, of Mira Sushi, sesame leaf wrap is extremely healthy – it features fresh vegetables and basic Korean flavors . The crunchy vegetables, like the cucumbers and carrots, give the dish texture whilethe sesame binds all the vibrant flavors together to give the dish savory appeal.Click here for more guilt-free party recipes. 
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4
Mung Bean Pancakes
Mung beans may not be a familiar ingredient to many cooks here, but these legumes are popular throughout much of Asia, and are becoming easier to find here. They can range in color from green to yellow to black, taste a little sugary, and are sold whole, split, or hulled. Opt for the hulled variety, which means you can skip the soak. In India, they are commonly used in curries like moong dal. Here, they are utilized in a popular and traditional Korean dish, often served at Seollal, the Lunar New Year. — Will Budiaman Click here to see Celebrate the Korean New Year.
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4
Roasted Duck Noodle Soup
This recipe is great for any home cook interested in making an authentic dish from Thailand. The roasted duck is rich and flavorful thanks to soy sauce and fragrant spices, and the noodle soup uses fresh cilantro for a bright finish. This delicious recipe is courtesy of Thailand: The Cookbook, THE definitive Thai Cookbook.     
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4
pad thai
This Pad Thai recipe is how you actually find it in Bangkok and comes from testing hundreds of different variations from food carts all over the city. Pad Thai is the ultimate street food. While "street food" may sound bad, food cart cooks are in such a competitive situation, with such limited space, ingredients and tools they need to specialize in a dish or two just to stay in business. The best of these cooks have cooked the same dish day-after-day, year-after-year, constantly perfecting it.This recipe is courtesy of ThaiTable
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4
Thai Grilled Chicken Salad
Here's a refreshing chicken salad that's perfect for those looking for something a little out of the ordinary. It makes for a fantastic and satisfying lunch dish and is also perfect to share as a first course for dinner. See all salad recipes.
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4
Pho and Champagne in Bed
When people ask me what my dream date is, I politely reply, "Champagne and pho... in bed!" Whether you're snuggled up with your sweetie, on your own in comfy pajamas, or with some girlfriends, this recipe is a mega-hit (sure, even at the good old dinner table). Enjoy one of my all-time favorites! To save time, use premade chicken stock and a cooked rotisserie chicken. Pair with your favorite champagne or sparkling wine. See all noodle recipes. Click here to see Getting Sexy in the Kitchen, 1 Day at a Time.
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3.1875
Pad Thai
Pad thai is quite possibly the reason many Americans have fallen in love with Thai cuisine. The sweet, sour, and salty noodles stir-fried with vegetables, dried shrimp, and oftentimes chicken is a good introduction to the basic and addictive flavors of Thai cooking. This noodle dish is a basic stir-fry. The trick to just about any stir-fry is to prep everything you can in advance. In this recipe, for example, you'll need to add turnip, dried shrimp, and tofu in quick succession, so make sure to have everything in your work area organized and ready to go before you start cooking.
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3