Cabernet Sauvignon

One of the so-called noble red-wine varieties, cabernet sauvignon is believed to have ancient ancestors, but seems to have appeared in its present form only in the 17th century. DNA evidence suggests that — appropriately to its name — it is a direct descendent of cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc. It can grow in many climates and soil types. It is the major red wine variety in Bordeaux and is found in many other parts of France. It has also been largely responsible for the worldwide reputation of California wine, especially through examples made in the Napa and Sonoma areas. Cabernet sauvignon is also an important cultivar in Spain, Italy, Eastern Europe, and the Mediterranean basin, as well as in Australia, South Africa, and Argentina and Chile. Wines made from the grape have a natural affinity for oak, so are often aged in oak barrels; they also have a high tannin content, which helps them to age well.

Serve With

Simply cooked lamb and beef dishes, stews, wild mushrooms, pasta with meat sauce, and Cheddar- or Gouda-type cheeses. Cabernet sauvignon also mates surprisingly well with chocolate. Roast meats and other simply cooked lamb and beef dishes, steaks and chops, meat stews, wild game, wild mushrooms, pasta with meat sauce, and Cheddar- or Gouda-type cheeses. Cabernet sauvignon also mates surprisingly well with chocolate.