Top Rated Scallion Recipes

Foil-Baked Cod With Oranges, Scallions, and Ginger
The citrus in this recipe complements the fish perfectly! This is a quick and easy option for a delicious evening (or weekend) meal.This recipe is courtesy of  Sitka Salmon Shares.
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4.75
Carrot Scallion Cake
Latkes are everyone's favorite Jewish fried food.  The typical latke is made with potato, flour and eggs.  I however, like to make a more Paleo friendly latke and now with this new recipe, I have 2 versions of Paleo pancakes.Generally at Hanukkah, I make a Butternut Squash Latke, though this year I was searching for a bit of variety and so came up with this Carrot Scallion Latke.  Why carrots?  Well, first of all, my younger son asked me to make a carrot latke.  Second, given my Paleo preferences, I eat carrots and not potatoes.  Third, carrots make a healthier latke than potatoes --why?  Carrots are rich in carotenoids which promote good vision, regulate blood sugar and may also promote colon health and prevent cancer --who knew?!  Potatoes on the other hand are tough for me to digest, high in starch and can wreak havoc on blood sugar.So, here, I present you with what I hope is healthier fried fare (if such a thing is possible) with these healthy and delicious Carrot Scallion Latkes.  Although Hanukkah is a celebration that entails a good deal of fried food, if you saute these in a bit of olive oil rather than deep frying them in inches of the stuff, they're a nice alternative to regular greasy Hanukkah food and a much healthier latke.At Hanukkah, we also make doughnuts, or donuts (in Hebrew we refer to them as sufganiyot) and other fried goodies. While I haven't come up with my own sufganiyot recipe, Tovah from Gluten-Free Bay has a great recipe for gluten-free sufganiyot (jelly donuts), and Silvana also has several lovely looking gluten free doughnut recipes in her book Cooking for Isaiah.
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4.25
Rice with Raisins and Scallion
By
Rice is rarely the star of a meal. Hood sour cream makes this rice with raisins and scallion the exception. After one serving of the light and flavorful side, you’ll wish it were the entrée. For more delicious seasonal recipes visit Hood.com.
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4
artichoke
I grew up eating whole artichokes with homemade mayo for dipping. These were a treat, something my mother and I would share or, when I was big enough, eat side by side. If we were eating the same head, there would always be a bit of tension when we got down to the heart, the best part. My mother would usually give it to me, after making sure to scrape out all remnants of the choke. I had pictured my death at the hand of an artichoke many times, but so long as there was someone around to double check my cleaning job, the danger only made the heart all the more desirable. I never remembered artichokes as a seasonal treat, but now I realize they must have been. Lately, the markets have been full of them, and when I see a beautiful bin, I can’t help but grab a pair (carefully) for my weekday lunches. Whole steamed artichokes are still one of my favorite meals when I am alone. I remember calling my mother up on the phone the first time I tried to make them myself. And, even a week ago, I’ll admit that I picked up the phone again for her to remind me how best to prepare them without a steamer. She told me to simply use my Dutch oven, and to fill it up with enough water to cover the artichoke’s heart. While my artichoke cooked, I made the mayo from scratch, using fresh scallions and a sprinkle of capers to add a fresh/briny punch. Forty minutes later, my artichoke was ready. It took me less than half the time to devour it, all the way down to the heart, which I cleaned delicately, and then enjoyed all to myself. — Phoebe
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4
Arthur's recipe for Aushak.
Sometimes you find a dish that turns a thing you've eaten a 100 times on its head. If you haven't had Aushak, they may do that. These Afghani scallion dumplings contain no cheese or meat, but vegetables — green onions — as a previously uncooked filling. I first ate Aushak around 2000 in an Afghani restaurant in Huntington on Long Island called Ariana, and have since had other renditions, including at Helmand in Cambridge (the Afghani restaurant belonging to Mahmood Karzai, the brother of Afghanistan's President Hamid Karzai), but there's no reason you can't make these. From filling and sauce to plate it'll take about an hour to make enough for two people. This recipe combines the best aspects from recipes by Ruth Reichl, Craig Claiborne, and Food.com. And yes, I hear you, "A dumpling isn't pasta! And hey, you're using wonton wrappers!" Well, technically, it's a ravioli. And as for wonton wrappers, they're a quick, easy replacement that give dishes a homemade pasta feel when you're in a rush. Click here to see Recipe SWAT Team: Pasta Dishes. 
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3.923075
Great for an appetizer, snack, or even a main course, these savory cakes come together in a snap, and are easy to make as they are delicious to eat.  Click here to see 10 Great Zucchini Recipes to Make with Your Bounty.
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3.8
This is a simple way to prepare whole fish, yet one that few Western cooks have mastered. In the Vietnamese culture, a properly steamed fish is a benchmark for chefs, and those who can't do it right are considered to be bad cooks. A perfectly steamed fish has flesh that is just cooked at the bone, never dry. Typically, whole fish are not served with the liquid in which it was steamed, which is too fishy tasting, and any sauce is added at the end, after the fish has been cooked. In this classic Chinese preparation, the fish is topped with scallions, cilantro and ginger, then doused with hot oil, which releases the flavor of the aromatics into the flesh of the fish.
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3.13369
Adding bacon and cheddar to your cornbread, and using Country Crock to keep the bread rich and moist, adds something special to an American staple.    
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3
Soft-Shell Crabs with Grilled Scallions and Lemon Polenta
Soft-shell crabs are in season in the spring, so keep your eye out because the soft-shell season doesn't last that long. Be sure to have the apron, lungs, and eyes removed by your fishmonger and use the crabs as soon as possible. Click here to see Getting Schooled in the Art of Mediterranean Cooking.
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3
Cheese Bread with Gruyère, Cheddar and Scallions
We love this bread because it’s delicious enough to eat without butter. If there is any left, save it for the next morning, and serve it under a poached egg.
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2.83871
Chinese Crackling Scallion and Garlic Sauce
In some ways, this recipe epitomizes my passion for simple, fresh sauces. It’s just hot oil infused with garlic and chiles and loaded with sliced scallions. It’s served crackling hot, poured straight from a wok onto whole fish, grilled steaks, roasted potatoes, or even bowls of plain rice. I call it “Chinese” because it reminds me of some of my favorite dishes. It’s part sauce, part condiment, and part stir-fry. The steely perfume of a hot wok or cast-iron skillet is an important ingredient in this preparation. I’ve made this with just about any greens I’ve had on hand. Try it with chopped ramps, kale, bok choy greens, arugula, or garlic chives. Chopped romaine lettuce works too.Make sure all of the ingredients are ready before you start. This is a last-minute preparation that is best made and served immediately.
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2.666665
mashed potatoes
Try this new version of mashed potatoes using scallion garlic oil. It's perfect to serve as a side during Thanksgiving dinner. Click here for 15 Asian-Inspired Thanksgiving Recipes
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2.5