Top Rated Piroshki Recipes

Piroshky or Pirozhki, is a Russian baked or fried bun stuffed with any manner of fillings. This piroshky recipe, made by Tatyana of "Every Day with Tatyana" is made with a cabbage, onion and pepper filling.
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gardinia
Ingredients: 1 Pizza dough 3 to 4 C. shredded cabbage and carrots 1 medium onion, chopped 1 lb. ground bison 2 C. cheddar cheese Brown ground bison with onion; drain. Add vegetables; cook until tender. Roll out dough; cut into 3x3 in. squares. Fill ...
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Tonkcats
Try Piroshki from Food.com. - 4324
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Cooking Light JANUARY 1997
Piroshki are little turnovers that can be either sweet or savory. Rather than the traditional sour cream pastry, this version uses a commercial bread dough which dramatically cuts the fat.
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We love it!!!!
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WildLightning
This recipe comes from the restaurant named The Kaleenka, out of the Bite of Seattle Cook Book.
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lor
These are very popular in Russia as-well-as other European countries.
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Alexandra Romanov
A simple egg pastry filled with lightly seasoned ground beef and onions, baked until golden , then brushed with melted butter and served.
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seattlelove
These are as authentic Russian as you can get without traveling to Russia
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by
forgetid
Ingredients: Cream Cheese Pastry 1 cup butter (2 sticks) 1 8 oz pkg. cream cheese 1/2 tsp. salt 2 cups sifted all-purpose flour 1 egg yolk 2 tsp. cream or milk Beat butter, cheese and salt together in mixer until completely smooth and blended. Work ...
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TAYLORSMOMMY
These are authentic Russian piroshki filled with ground beef and onion, seasoned with dill weed and deep fried. You could also add a little cheese in the filling as you are making them. They also may be baked.
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Julesong
One of my favorite restaurants in Seattle was Kaleenka's on First Avenue. I loved their borshch and piroshky, and I always felt warm and comfortable in the restaurant. Kaleenka's has unfortunately closed, but I did find their recipe for piroshky in "Dining Ethnic Around Puget Sound" which was published in 1993. Kaleenka featured good Russian hearty fare, traditional cooking from the Ukraine, Uzbekistan, and Georgia. The name "Kaleenka" was derived from a ubiquitous shrub that grows all across Russia, which is revered since ancient times as a symbol of the land and culture. The Kaleenka notes that "piroshky" is derived from a Russian word pronounced "peer," which means "feast." Many different fillings are common, including chicken, fish, and fruits, but this beef and cheese filling is the favorite. Prep includes time for the rising of the dough.
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