Top Rated Duck Recipes

Fettuccine with Duck Ragout
This ragout recipe from New York City chef Michael Toscano (head chef/owner of Jeffrey’s Grocery, Perla, and Montmartre) is as simple as it is flavorful. Bonus: The rich duck pairs perfectly with a deep red Bordeaux wine! Check out our suggestions from Pearl & Ash’s wine director and expert sommelier Patrick Cappiello. Click Here For More Pasta Recipes
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5
Duck Pho
Traditionally made with beef, this Vietnamese Pho dish greatly benefits from the meatiness of duck, in combination with the classic Pho spices and garnishes. Although the recipe calls for the addition of foie gras, it is an optional indulgence. - Valaer MurrayFrom Chef Anita Lo of Annisa
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5
Seared Duck Breasts with Armagnac-Blackberry Sauce
This recipe is courtesy of David McAninch, from his book Duck Season. The Pekin duck is a domestic American breed and the most popular duck to eat, while the moulard (a cross between a Muscovy duck and a Pekin duck) is the preferred duck for foie gras.“The name has a fancy ring, but this dish — one of dozens that pair magret with a sweet pan reduction — is as straightforward as can be.”— David McAninch
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4.666665
Anita Lo's Frisee and Duck Liver Salad
This simple salad is tossed with a hot dressing, made from the caramelized bits left in the pan after sautéing the livers, which slightly wilts the greens and adds additional duck flavor. - Valaer MurrayFrom Anita Lo of AnnisaClick here to see the post Cooking Class with Chef Anita Lo
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4.666665
duck
The original method for making the dish is to cure duck legs in spices and salt, submerge them in duck fat, and cook them very slowly until they emerge crispy and crunchy from the oven. But just imagine the amount of duck fat needed! That’s why this recipe is such a godsend for duck confit-lovers. It does require a 24-hour wait before cooking, but the results are worth every minute.
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4.5
Thai food is really stepping out there for me, especially because I'm sick of my hamburgers-every-night-for-dinner routine. This was the first time I had ever tried duck, and I have to say it was amazing.    Recipe from Sizzling Skillets and Other One-Pot Wonders by Emeril Lagasse.
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4.333335
Chef Valette represents his Sonoma, Calif., home with this elegant duck dish, glazed in a maple syrup and champagne vinegar reduction so that it’s sweet and savory.
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4.25
Hirsheimer & Hamilton​
The idea of stewing or braising duck with garden peas as a summertime dish dates back at least to the eighteenth century. In 1769, Elizabeth Raffald gave a recipe for half-roasted duck stewed with “good gravy, a little mint, and three or four sage leaves”; boiled green peas are added as soon as the gravy has thickened. Eliza Acton, seventy-six years later, offers instructions for stewing ducks, then notes that “they may be served with a small portion only of their sauce, laid in a circle, with green peas à la Francaise, heaped high in the center . . .” In her 1879 volume The Cookery Book (later called Margaret Sim’s Cookery), described by a contemporary magazine as being “no unworthy sequel to that of the classical Meg Dodds [sic]”, the Scottish writer Margaret Sim calls for braising the bird “in the usual way” and separately cooking peas with shredded lettuce, green onions, and parsley as a garnish. According to the early twentieth-century restaurant chronicler Lieutenant Colonel Newnham-Davis, Lord Dudley (presumably the thirteenth Baron Dudley, Ferdinando Dudley Henry Lea Smith) considered the dish as one of the possible main courses for a typical British dinner “fit for an emperor,” along with neck of venison and chicken with asparagus. The combination of duck and peas is hardly fashionable today, but the dish is delicious. Recipe courtesy of cookbook The British Table: A New Look at the Traditional Cooking of England, Scotland, and Wales by Colman Andrews. Click here to purchase your own copy. 
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4.25
Apple Ducking
Bobbing for apples is the perfect way to include a fun and festive activity at your Halloween bash. This drink is inspired by Apple Bobbing, or as it's called in England, Apple Ducking.This recipe is courtesy of Natasha David of the Nitecap.
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4
Prunes
I will, as I always do, cook duck for Thanksgiving. The reason is the fat. A duck may look slimmer, but when cooked it rarely dries out, while a turkey that’s leaner often does. To choose a leaner meat may be a good idea in general, but I definitely prefer something tastier. Related: A Toast of Trumpets  If you think the duck renders too much fat while baking, I suggest you spoon off the overflow for use in other treats. Potatoes fried in duck fat are heavenly and a duck-fat omelette is marvelous. When done right, duck fat even stores really well. Related: Carmelized Apple Tart  I also recommend using all the parts that come with it. The liver can be chopped up and sautéed with shallots, coriander, and cumin or seasoned with lime and cilantro for a perfect appetizer. The neck (and head and feet) and rest of the giblets make a great base for a stock (see below). This week’s recipe is my own creation, but I learned the baking method from both my mother and Elizabeth David (French Provincial Cooking, 1960). Happy Thanksgiving. — Johanna Kindvall Related: Bacon Cups 
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4
Roasted Duck Noodle Soup
This recipe is great for any home cook interested in making an authentic dish from Thailand. The roasted duck is rich and flavorful thanks to soy sauce and fragrant spices, and the noodle soup uses fresh cilantro for a bright finish. This delicious recipe is courtesy of Thailand: The Cookbook, THE definitive Thai Cookbook.     
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4
Ahhhh, my favorite time of year is here. It’s officially Fall. The temp is dropping, soon the leaves will be too after that magnificent color change. All of this revelry in the season got me thinking of some sort of fall themed recipe. It took some doing but I finally came up with the Grilled Mallard Duck.
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3.387095