Top Rated Brisket Recipes

Full Moon BBQ's recipe carefully combines herbs and spices to create the finest dry rub for a black angus brisket. Smoking brisket is a treasured tradition in the south that has to be performed by a real pit master, which is why we want to share our secret.
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5
What makes a classic brisket is a rich braising liquid made from salty broths, soup mixes, ketchup, and canned tomato sauce. But it is easy to make this fork-tender dish without the high-sodium ingredients. Simply mix strong spices, apricot jam, no-salt-added tomato purée, and a kick of horseradish together for a powerhouse marinade that infuses the meat with the traditional flavors and keeps it moist throughout the hours of roasting.
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4.5
Onion-Braised Brisket
If you’re not fond of onions – even when lengthy cooking has tamed any harshness and brought out savory sweetness – you can skip to dessert right now. Because this braised brisket recipe uses almost as much onion as meat, and very little else by way of aromatic vegetables. There are no carrots, no leeks, no celery: just sliced onions, a little garlic and an herb or two (which, between us, you could omit).The idea came from a Belgian beef recipe: carbonnades à la Flamande, also packed with onions (though not quite so many), but with a far longer ingredients list that includes beer rather than wine as part of the braising liquid. It struck me that a rich, delicious dish could lean more heavily on the onions. Happily both Jackie and I (and, luckily, our dinner guests) love them, so we were a natural audience.It was as flavorsome as expected, with a copious amount of deep, dark, naturally sweet onion sauce that was as delicious with the accompaniment as with the tender brisket itself.Make this a day or two before you plan to eat it: This will enable you to trim excess fat from the cooled beef and to remove fat that has risen to the surface of the sauce and congealed in the fridge. It also makes it easier to cut the meat into neat slices for reheating and serving. We served ours with potato dumplings, but crushed boiled potatoes, potato pancakes or egg noodles would be excellent alternatives.
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4.5
Brisket and Pumpkin Chili
A deeply flavored chili, with the unexpected addition of pumpkin. Perfect to serve on a cool fall night. - Allison Beck
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4.5
The authors of Wicked Good Burgers are very clearly barbecue experts, and this recipe incorporates all of their skills into a brisket burger. Seasoned with a unique barbecue rub and topped with a pit sauce for the finish, this concoction had us wanting to make a lot more burgers out of brisket.  Click here to see 50 Best Burger Recipes
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4.25
braised brisket
The addition of fresh horseradish to this garnish feels thematically appropriate, and it carries a key flavor of the Seder through the delicious main course.This recipe is courtesy of Liza Schoenfein. 
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4
Enjoy The Melting Pot's savory smoked barbecue brisket, medium-sharp cheddar and Emmenthaler Swiss cheeses, fresh tomatoes and scallions for the perfect summer meal.
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4
Brisket
Once you understand the basic technique of searing and braising, you can customize your own version with a variety of flavorful additions that excite you — 40 cloves of garlic; herbs like thyme or a little rosemary; spices such as cumin, cinnamon, or curry powder; red wine instead of beer; or carrots and parsnips added during the last hour of cooking.  If you're not in the mood for brisket, go ahead and braise short ribs. Or a shoulder of pork. The concept is the same: Season and sear the meat, add aromatics like garlic and onion, and then cook slowly in a flavorful liquid until it gets as tender as you are tough.
 Serve alongside something that will welcome all the sauce, like mashed potatoes, noodles, couscous, or a baguette, and some bagged salad greens with a sprinkle of olive oil, lemon, and salt.
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4
When you're entertaining a crowd at a backyard cookout or a tailgating party, serve these moist and delectable brisket sliders. Click here to see  10 Top Tailgating Recipes
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4
This is the go-to recipe for knowledgeable beef brisket lovers — who then share it with others, who share it with (perhaps) the Obamas and other notable families. So warm and welcoming, the secret is what Nach did way before anyone else: slice the meat midway through cooking. If you serve this the day after you make it, reheat, covered, for about 1 hour in a 325-degree oven.   Adapted from "The New Basics Cookbook" by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins (Workman, 1989)
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3.5
Sliced Brisket
This family recipe has been perfected over the years and is one that we are certain you will enjoy. Prepare it for the Jewish holidays or to celebrate National Brisket Day on May 28th. 
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3.25
www.thedailymeal.com/cooking-guinness-0
Brisket is often corned in Ireland, but it is also appreciated in its native form; a tough but flavorful cut, it lends itself particularly well to long, slow pot-roasting. Serve this pot-roast with mashed or boiled potatoes, if you like.Click here to see the Cooking with Guinness story. Adapted from “The Country Cooking of Ireland” by Colman Andrews. 
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3.25