Top Rated Tartare Recipes

Salmon tartare
I love fish. I can eat sushi three times a day and twice for breakfast. And it's not that salmon can't be prepared well. It's just usually boring, reminiscent of bad wedding food, and tasting of, well, cooked salmon. There's just something funky about it.But there are three ways I'll eat it with abandon: with an inch of Temptee on a fresh Bagel Boss bagel, after a tequila and jalapeño overnight cure, and raw, dressed with just citrus and salt. The last preparation, presented here, benefits from only taking three minutes to make. Just eat it right away.Click here to see Recipe SWAT Team: Salmon 8 Ways
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Copycat Red Lobster Tartar Sauce recipe - The Daily Meal
Companies as large as Red Lobster tend to be very tight-lipped when it comes to “trade secrets.” This recipe comes pretty darn close to replicating the real thing, according to reviews. It starts with a base of Miracle Whip, instead of mayo. This creates a sweeter flavor profile, which is right on track with the taste of Red Lobster's famous tartar sauce.This recipe is by Ron Douglas, author of the “America’s Most Wanted Recipes” series (Atria Books, 2009), and was originally published in the South Florida Sun Sentinel.
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Conch Croquettes and Pickled Pineapple Tartar Sauce
This recipe was developed by chef Nina Compton, owner of Compere Lapin in New Orleans. This dish is inspired by her childhood in St. Lucia, where fresh conch was a regular part of her diet. You can use fresh or frozen conch for this, or even boiled shrimp would work well. The pickled pineapple tartar sauce also gives the dish an island feel.Recipe courtesy of chef Nina Compton, owner of Compere Lapin
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4.5
Rainbow Play Dough
On a rainy day when you're spending more time at home, break out the rainbow play dough. Play dough is perfect for kids ages three to twelve. They can mold this classic craft into anything they want, from animals to their favorite city. This recipe is courtesy of McCormick. 
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4.5
Vanilla Sugar Cookies
For an additional flourish, decorate these no-roll sugar cookies with homemade Colored Sugar or Sugar Cookie Icing.Recipe courtesy of McCormick
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4.5
3-Ingredient Cloud Bread
This light and fluffy snack can be made with only three ingredients. Cloud bread is a low-carb treat that is great for sandwiches and more. Recipe courtesy of McCormick 
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4.5
Strawberry Sugar Cookies
These Strawberry Sugar Cookies are perfectly chewy on the inside and crispy around the edges. Sweetened with freeze-dried strawberries, these cookies are deliciously sweet! Recipe courtesy of Imperial Sugar
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4.5
Tartar Sauce
At New York City's Pearl Oyster Bar, the must-get dish — aside from the lobster roll, of course — is the fried oysters appetizer. And apart from the superior fry, the key to the dish's success is the tartar sauce. Tangy, a touch of citrus, and crunch from the diced cornichons: It's fantastic. This my best attempt to recreate it. Click here to see Recipe SWAT Team: Condiments
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This fried catfish is flavored with red pepper, garlic salt and onion powder after being coated in egg wash and dipped in cornmeal. Serve the crispy catfish with a side a tartar sauce. Recipe courtesy of McCormick
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Can't decide between salmon or tuna tartare? Parfait them. Want more from David Burke? Check out his weekly column for The Daily Meal. 
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Fish and Chips With Tartar Sauce
What can I say… a British classic, a golden-battered, "Rule, Britannia!"-warbling stalwart that is as iconically British as roast beef, plum pudding, and a surfeit of beer. It has always been on the Fortnum’s menu, and is an eternal best-seller. Here, it’s breadcrumbed, with Japanese panko, rather than battered, which gives a really crisp coating to the fish. Light, too.The chips, fat and proud, should be double-cooked, for a crisp exterior and soft centre. Always make sure you use fresh, clean oil. You can prepare everything in advance up to the last frying.Oh, and the dish is not John Bull British in origin, as you might have believed, rather a happy marriage of Jewish (Ashkenazi immigrants would sell cold fried fish on the streets of London) and French (who invented the chip as we know it). But worry not, flag-wavers… it was the British who put the two together. And the Brits who still worship at its burnished, lightly vinegared feet. — Tom Parker Bowles, author of Fortnum & Mason: The CookbookBe sure to serve your fish and chips with homemade minted peas. For the recipe, click here.
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3.625
Salmon Burger Recipe
Looking for healthy and delicious burger recipe? Why not grill up some good-for-you salmon burgers. 
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