Top Rated Sancocho Recipes

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Troy A. Hakala
The national dish of the Dominican Republic
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John Camacho
This is a typical dish from Colombia, South America. A chicken stew made with plantain and cassava that is served with a fresh tomato and onion sauce.
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"There are many versions of this stew-soup in Central and South America. Scented with cumin, it makes a hearty supper on a chilly winter night."
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Junot Díaz
Talk about comfort food. This traditional stew combines all manner of meat with two different kinds of tubers. Sour orange lends a uniquely Caribbean flair. We like to brighten our sancocho by pairing it with avocado, rice, and cilantro, and to inject a little heat with a splash of hot sauce. We would not turn down an accompanying plate of crunchy tostones (twice-fried green plantains).
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Pikake21
From Simply Delicioso-this is a Colombian version of the very popular soup. To serve, remove the "drier" ingredients from the soup-the corn, meat, yucca-and arrange on a separate dish to be served alongside the brothy soup.
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Victoria #2
With great joy I have received many favorable comments from readers of other websites on the latest Colombian food recipes that I have submitted. The food of my country is as varied as its landscape and its people so I can share with you many typical delicious recipes. This time I want to share with you a recipe from a region of my country called Valle del Cauca, which combines several ingredients in an extraordinary way, is called Sancocho Valluno and is very easy to prepare. For 8 servings you need:
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Ice Cool Kitty
Sancocho means to parboil, but most often refers to a soup, usually made with chicken and yuca (cassava) and plantains. The reason it got the name Sancocho is that it is cook relatively fast and at a high temperature, or in a pressure cooker. This version is called Amarillo (yellow) because it includes ingredients (turmeric, annatto seeds) to make the broth appear yellowish. They are optional, of course. If you cannot find some of the vegetables, just double up on what you can find. I put the batata in parenthesis next to the yautia because it is not in the database at all. You can use both if you can find them.
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fluffernutter
My DH loves the chewy, waxy texture of tropical root vegetables. It's a chore to peel them all, but once a year I make the effort for him. Use a mixture of yuca, boniato and malanga for the root vegetables - the 'zaar editing system doesn't recognize their names. This stew is loosely based on sancocho, the national dish of the Dominican Republican. There's no meat in this version, though, and it's cooked in the microwave, which is great for our searing hot summers in the South.
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Panamanian-Canadian angel
There are a few versions of sancocho out there (in fact, there are probably multiple recipes of it within the same country), but this is the way my grandma used to make it. Sancocho is basically a chicken based soup that gets its distinct flavour from cilantro and yuca (or cassava).
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La_Nanita
This is another favorite in my household. I have addapted this recipe for the slow cooker, I like to leave it cooking while we go to church on Sundays. But it works just as well on the stove top and even better over a fire pit, with shorter cooking times. And if you ever have a killer hang over, this soup will fix you right up! That is why it is traditionally eaten the day after a big party. This soup can easily be made with any combination of the proteins and is also made with seafood. I have not prepared with seafood yet, but would imagine that you have to let the veggetables cook by themselves for a while before adding in the fish as it is more delicate.
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Ingrid Hoffmann
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Chef #500620
This is a typical Venezuelan sunday brunch dish. If you like hot dishes, add all the peppers to your personal taste! This recipe is very flexible. You can add or remove ingredients, and vary subjectively all the proportions at your whim, taste, and judgement.
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