Top Rated Lemongrass Recipes

Lemongrass Chicken Pad Thai
Everyone loves chicken pad thai, Thailand's deliciously spicy noodle dish. The noodles used are rice sticks, which, besides being delightfully chewy, are gluten-free (for those allergic to it) and "cooked" simply by soaking. My version is easier to make than many others — I've eliminated the traditional tamarind, which is hard to find and fussy to prepare — but nothing is lost in the flavor department, I promise. I include the traditional scrambled eggs, but you can omit them, if you like. You'll still have a wonderfully satisfying dish. Click here to see Beam Ming Tsai into the Kitchen.
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For this simple chicken and Chinese long bean recipe that works well as a brown bag lunch, Mark Bittman gave loose amounts for the ingredients so that you can adjust the serving size. 
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The essential cold summer soup from Spain, gazpacho is made with fresh tomatoes, peppers, and country bread soaked in olive oil.
This light, fruity juice smells as good as it looks. Breathe deeply as you drink and think about how much better you feel after a cleanse. Read more about Expensive Juice Cleanses You Can DIY Cheaply at Home.
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Roasted Sardines, Lemongrass, and Tomatoes
Ripe tomatoes and fresh lemongrass bring new heights of flavor to these baked sardines. Serve on toast for an easy and elegant appetizer! A white wine from Côtes de Bordeaux is ideal to play off the flavors of the fish.
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Sometimes we forget about these powerful, medicinal little plants that lend their gorgeous flavor and aroma. Run herbs through your juicer like you would with greens. Mint, chocolate mint, spearmint, and others are beautiful in combination with sweet fruits or greens, and have a cooling effect. I love mint with cucumber, spinach, ruby red grapefruit, and apple. Fennel is another wonderful addition, and whether you’re using the stalks, blub, or fronds (or all three), it will flavor your juice with the sweet and herbal taste of anise. And don’t forget about the savory herbs, basil, thyme, rosemary, sage, oregano, dill, and one and on. These add depth to savory vegetable juices and complexity to sweet and citrusy juices. Look for fresh herbs in your garden, your farmers market, co-op, and grocery store. There’s a lot you can do with a little bit of herbs. One of my favorite summer juices stars lemongrass, which wafts like a bright and sultry perfume through watermelon, Asian pear, and pineapple.
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Lemongrass & Seafood Soup
Authentically prepared with seafood, this wonderful soup is loaded with aromatics and seasoned with lime and fish sauce. It is a perfect blend of salty, sweet and sour to soothe whatever ails you.
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Thai Sweet and Sour Soup with Lobster Mushrooms, Lemongrass, and Shrimp
This soup is based on the classic Thai dish known as tom yum goong; the secret to making a great one is to put all your effort and love into making a great stock. I encourage you to use dried lobster mushrooms here, as their rehydration liquid, along with the toasted shrimp shell stock, makes a fine base for the soup. Extra bonus: The rehydrated lobster mushrooms retain a touch of chewiness that makes for a great textural contrast. — Shroom, by Becky Selengut Click Here to See More Soup Recipes
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Tim Wildin is Brand Director for ShopHouse. He likes to use his Thanksgiving leftovers to create a Thai alternative to the turkey sandwich:  “My dad (American) would always make fun of my mom (Thai) and I because he'd say we would make Thai food from leftovers of the most American meal of the year. We'd shred the leftover turkey, mince it really finely, and make 'laab' (a Thai minced meat salad, for lack of a better term) with it. Much better than a turkey sandwich!”
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What's more classic to celebrate the Kentucky Derby than wearing a fancy hat with a mint julep in hand? Southern Living's new cookbook Feel Good Food has a great festive way to gather on Derby Day — set up a mint julep bar with assorted flavored syrups like Grapefruit-Honey and Peach-Basil.
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Watermelon, Lime, & Lemongrass Juice Recipe
Make the most of summer watermelon with this cool, tangy refresher.
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Food plays a big role in a Vietnamese funeral. To prepare the deceased for the journey, at the wake the mouth is kept open so visitors can drop in grains of rice. Mourners bring a bowl of rice to place on top of the coffin so that by the end of the wake, there will be so much weight on top that the devil will not be able to get into the coffin. On the 49th and 100th days after the death, the family gathers to remember the deceased with a special meal; bun ho often fits the bill.In the book Death Warmed Over: Funeral Food, Rituals, and Customs From Around the World learn how 75 different cultures from various countries and religions around the world use food in conjunction with death in ritualistic, symbolic, and even nutritious ways.Photo Modified: flickr/ goodiesfirst
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The essential cold summer soup from Spain, gazpacho is made with fresh tomatoes, peppers, and country bread soaked in olive oil.
Pears are a significant source of dietary fiber and vitamin C, and since much of the fiber in the fiber in the pear is insoluble it makes an effective laxative, and nothing slows you down like a sluggish digestive system full of toxins. Coconut milk is loaded with vitamins B, C, and E which boost the immune system and provide energy to cells. It’s also a good source of minerals magnesium, potassium, phosphorous and iron, all of which regulate and support various systems including the heart, the nerves, and red blood cells that carry oxygen to the brain. It’s also rich in antioxidants which help repair the body, eliminate toxins, and keep your energy soaring. And as a note of interest, lemongrass oil has antifungal properties, and, amazingly, it is used to preserve manuscript collections at several institutions in India. If it can keep ancient manuscripts going, maybe it will keep you going too.
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