Top Rated Daikon Recipes

Bibimbap
This classic recipe comes to us from NYC's The Woo, where Executive Chef Eli Martinez cooks up modern takes on iconic Korean dishes.Once you have all of the ingredients prepped, bibimbap is a fairly simple dish. We suggest making big batches of the components ahead of a dinner party or for weekday meal prep, and then assembling and cooking the dish will only take a matter of minutes.
View Recipe
4.5
Banh Mi Burger
Transform a classic Vietnamese banh mi sandwich into a burger by swapping the roasted meat for a spicy, umami-packed burger.This recipe is courtesy of Nomageddon.
View Recipe
4.5
With locations in New York, Boston, Miami, Las Vegas, and internationally, Zuma creates some of the best Japanese cuisine on the planet. This is their spicy tuna roll recipe, which you'll find is simple enough to make at home, even for a novice sushi-maker. Be sure to buy the highest quality sushi-grade tuna at your local fish market. If your grocery store doesn't carry some of the Japanese ingredients, don't fret! The sushi will still be delicious if it's missing some of the elements. Feel free to play around with other common sushi ingredients like scallions, sriracha, chili oil, etc.For an even easier version, you could skip the rolling and simply combine all of the ingredients without the nori to create a spicy tuna bowl. Recipe courtesy of Zuma.
View Recipe
4.5
Daikon Radish Kimchi
Daikon radish is another common kimchi, which soaks up the marinade phenomenally well and remains addictively crisp for a few days.Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
View Recipe
4
Vietnamese Vermicelli Bowl (Bùn)
This simple, refreshing dish that's a staple in many Vietnamese restaurants around the world was one of my favorite things to order when eating out in Little Saigon in Orange County, Calif. It can be thought of as a "noodle salad" — vermicelli noodles are served on top of a bed of lettuce and herbs, pickled daikon and carrot, and topped with some type of grilled meat — traditionally pork in the Hanoi style, lemongrass grilled beef, grilled chicken, or grilled shrimp. Then, it all gets topped with a fish-sauce based "dressing" that gets mixed in just before eating. Delicious. If you plan on whipping this up again quickly in the future, make a double batch of dressing to cut down on prep time. Click here to see 7 Easy Sriracha Recipes.
View Recipe
4
Baechu Kimchi
Napa cabbage: The granddaddy of all kimchi. This is the kimchi that people think of when they hear the word kimchi—from taco topper to the cooler case at Ralph’s. There are literally thousands of different kimchi recipes and combinations, tied to the seasons. That said, this recipe is special.Traditionally, napa kimchi is made in the late autumn (October through December) to prepare for the famously harsh Korean winter. The tradition is called kimjang, and back in the day entire communities got together to make it in large batches. We’re talking as much as 100 heads of cabbage at at time, with recipes passed down village to village, generation to generation. But you can certainly make yourself a batch any time during the year if you can find plump and healthy napa cabbage.Buying the cabbage. Look for cabbage that appears healthy and fresh; remove the outer few layers of leaves if anything is browned. At Korean markets, the peeling away of blighted leaves is often done right in the store. The remaining leaves should be tightly packed.The paste and marinade. Next make the rice flour paste (an important binder) and the marinade, which includes an essential ingredient: salted fermented shrimp called saeujeot. While many recipes callfor fish sauce, we feel the salted shrimp add a pronounced flavor that is just too good to omit. Once combined with the cabbage (don’t forget to wear gloves!) and stuffed into glass jars or plastic containers of varying sizes, the waiting game begins.Kimchi is alive and always changing. Kimchi is all about personal taste, and some like their kimchi fresh, while others like it older and funkier. Our general suggestion is to make a large batch (like 6 to 8 heads) and store it in several jars to sample after different time periods. But if you’re new to the kimchi making process, start small with the recipe here and scale up later. After 5 days, pull out a small jar and eat it wrapped in lettuce with a hunk of grilled Kalbi. After 10 days, pull another jar and place on the table with Godeungeo Gui. Keep one in the back of your refrigerator for two months and stew it down in a Kimchi Jjigae. Or, at any age, just snack on it directly from the jar. Give a jar to your best friend or boss or favorite food fan. This is a serious stocking stuffer. Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
View Recipe
4
Japanese Short Rib Stew
This short rib stew is inspired by a traditional Japanese comfort food dish, nikujaga, a stew made with either pork or beef and potatoes. I added a few more vegetables here to make it a more well-rounded dish. See all stew recipes. Click here to see Heavenly Short Rib Recipes.
View Recipe
3.42857
Spicy Kimchi Yuba “Noodles” With Poached Egg
The question of Stuart Brioza’s love of kimchi is answered with a trip up a wobbly ladder to a secret loft space turned fermentation lab above his insanely popular San Francisco restaurant, State Bird Provisions. In this crawl space, we spotted large buckets of napa cabbage and daikon radish kimchi, which the chef makes year-round using chopped-up Beausoleil oysters. “I’m a Bay Area kid, so the idea of mixing cultures comes naturally to me,” he says, sipping an espresso in the restaurant’s sunny dining room. We’re talking about the marriage of Japanese yuba—the delicate skin that forms on top of soy milk while making tofu—with Korean kimchi, a dish he has served since the early days of State Bird, and one that has become one of the restaurants’ signatures.Brioza was nice enough to slip us the recipe, and we’ve made it many times since. Whenever we can find fresh yuba, sold at Asian supermarkets, we have this relatively simple recipe top of mind. The inviting, fragile-but-chewy texture of the tofu skin and the richness of the egg yolk are beautifully contrasted with a burst of Kimchi Vinaigrette (recipe follows). It’s easy to make, but also slightly chef-y and out of the box. And if you happen to be reading this during Dungeness crab season, it’s a great addition at the end. Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
View Recipe
3
Sriracha-Marinated Chicken Bánh Mì
Vietnamese bánh mì sandwiches have become so trendy over the past five years that it's almost painful. It's gotten to the point when you see one on a menu that you know before ordering that it's best to stray far, far away from that portion of it. Besides, why order something out that you can make just as well if not better at home. There, I said it. You don't have to be Vietnamese to make a good bánh mì, and it's easy. The basic ingredients for a bánh mì sandwich? Steamed, pan-roasted, or oven-roasted meat and soy fillings like Vietnamese sausage, pork patties, pork liver pâté, and grilled chicken, topped with cucumber slices, cilantro, shredded pickled carrots and daikon, mayonnaise, sliced chiles, and chile sauce. This simple recipe (really simple, I swear) combines two of the above ingredients — chicken (thigh meat) and chile sauce (Sriracha) — for a moist, flavorful effect. The key to great bánh mì? Moist meat. Adequate distribution. Overall moisture. And is just good bread with a thin crust and strategic layering technique for maximum ingredients and efficient distribution. This recipe was carried out using some really terrific bread baked by Leske's Bakery, a Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, original since 1961, and bought at Chubby Mary's, a new favorite sandwich shop by the Artichoke Basille crew in New York's East Village. What's the big deal about the bread? You don't need to go to Leske's or Chubby Mary's (though you could do much worse), but a really light and airy bread that's crusty outside and still moist and airy inside will be key. (Leske's would be great for a po'boy, too, by the way.)  Click here to see 7 Easy Sriracha Recipes.
View Recipe
2