Top Rated Crostata Recipes

crostata
Barberries play a large role in Persian cooking. The dried fruit can be used to add a tart flavor to any savory or sweet dish or dessert.Recipe courtesy of McCormick.
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4.666665

Grab a Plate
When someone says “as easy as pie,” they’ve never baked with my mom. This Apple Crostata with Oat Crumble Topping is easy to make…it was just hard to pin down! The Perfect Mixture This recipe is really a cross between a pie and a crostata (“pietata,” anyone?). Whatever you call it, it’s my mom’s hard-captured recipe, worth every bit of the wrestling I had to do to get it down in print. Whether you call this pie or crostata, you’ll probably use “delicious” to describe it. This recipe makes enough dough for two, 9.5-inch pie pans (or crostatas) and enough filling for one. You can freeze the remaining dough for up to two months. If you don’t want to use a pie pan for this recipe, roll out your dough into a large circle (about 11-12 inches) then place it on a baking sheet. Add the apple filling to the center of the dough, and fold and pleat it all the way around as you would if you were following the instructions below.  
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2.5

Nectarine Crostata
What could be better for a summertime party than individual tarts filled with the best stone fruit of the season? When it comes to making truly good tarts, you won't want to cut corners, which is why we make everything from scratch.
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Inspired by George Germon and Johanne Killeen Cucina Simpatica
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Copyright 2003, Jill Davie, All Rights Reserved
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jzarzyck
Ingredients: For the pastry (2 tarts): 2 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 cup granulated or superfine sugar 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 pound very cold unsalted butter, diced For the filling (1 tart): 1 1/2 pounds McIntosh, Macoun, or Empire apples 1/4 ...
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of Gale Gand
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Melissa Rubel Jacobson
Free-form tarts (sometimes called crostatas) are an easy, quick-to-prepare way to use up seasonal fruit.
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Giada De Laurentiis
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Pets'R'us
The crostata dough is basically used for a rustic tart. It can be filled with almost any kind of fruit filling. It is particularly good with figs or berries or combination thereof.
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Penuchek
Italian crostatas are rustic free-form tarts that can't be ruined by poor pastry makers. If you tear the dough as you roll it, there's nothing to worry about. Just press the torn parts together and keep rolling. As long as you can get something that resembles a round onto a baking sheet, you're on your way to a fine crostata. This open-faced tart, spread with peaches or prune plums, apples, or roasted vegetables with a little parmesan, begins with a food-processor pastry dough that couldn't be more forgiving. After the filling goes onto the rough round, fold up the edges to encase the fruit and send it to the oven brushed with milk and sprinkled with sugar. If the finished confection looks asymmetrical, that's part of the charm. This pastry recipe can be topped with roasted vegetables and a little parmesan, which I have done, absolutely delicious! Use your imagination. This recipe courtesy of the Boston Globe Magazine.
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Gina Marie Miraglia Eriquez
A rich filling is studded with walnuts and imbued with citrusy notes of orange, then packaged between a crust and a lattice top, both made from the cookie-like pastry dough known as pasta frolla in Italy.
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