Top Rated Chinese Recipes

Chinese Barbeque Sauce
This Chinese barbecue sauce is easy to make and is great on top of your favorite grilled vegetables or meats.
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For this simple chicken and Chinese long bean recipe that works well as a brown bag lunch, Mark Bittman gave loose amounts for the ingredients so that you can adjust the serving size. 
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How to Make Peking Duck for Chinese New Year's
The Chinese culture is known for its festive banquets, particularly for weddings and Chinese New Year's celebrations, and crispy Peking duck. January 23, 2012 marks the new year so out with the "year of the rabbit" and in with the firey dragon. The dragon is a symbol of power and wealth. What could be better than a meal fit for an emperor -- Peking Duck? Cooking Peking duck at home is fun but also quite time consuming. I find this recipe to be relatively easy to follow and strongly suggest it's worth the try. The key to good Peking duck is the many-stage and all-day process of drying the skin, removing excess fat and glazing the bird with aromatic ingredients so that the roasted bird is crispy on the outside, lean, not greasy, and very moist on the inside. Choose fresh -- never frozen -- Long Island duckling, whenever possible. And start cooking the night before or early in the morning to allow the skin to dry out before cooking. Drying the skin is step one. Hang it using a kitchen twine wrapped under its wings and over a kitchen cabinet knob. A household fan speeds up the process. While the duck is drying (which will take several hours), you can go shopping for the fresh vegetables and other ingredients for your Chinese New Year's banquet. I like to serve a complimentary Asian side dish such as bok choy. A 5-minute bath in a honey glaze is step two. When you lower the duck into the wok be careful not splash the hot liquid. Step three is  repeating the drying process for the freshly glazed skin. The Time-Life recipe that I used to guide me the first time I made Peking Duck calls for one hour in front of a fan during the second drying; however, I followed several other recipes that call for longer drying times (the drier the skin the crispier the duck). Three hours is good if you have time or overnight in the refrigerator (you'll have to create a makeshift device to hang the duck in your fridge). Leave plenty of time to make the pancakes. My favorite part is to peel the pancakes apart. When I have it, I use beach plum jam to make a homemade sauce instead of bottled hoisin sauce although store-bought hoisin works quite well. About 2-1/2 hours before you plan to serve dinner, and when the skin is dry like “parchment paper”, roast the duck. As detailed in the recipe and shown in the phote, the duck is plated on a serving dish with the various parts of the duck separated and and served on different plates (crispy skin, legs, breast meat). To eat, diners take a pancake, brush on hoisin or beach plum jam sauce using a scallion that's been cut to make a "paint brush", put duck meat and skin on top of the pancake, and roll it up with all the ingredients inside. Then, take a heavenly bite. For step-by-step photos please visit: Lighthearted Locavore's "How to Make Peking Duck for Chinese New Year's"
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Chinese Packet Pork Chops
This recipe celebrates that “other” drawer in your kitchen. You know the one; it’s packed with take-out menus and chopsticks of dinners long gone. Somewhere between the giant serving spoon, chip clips, and unpaired plastic utensils, you too have those little sauce packets from Chinese delivery. Today is their day. Fish ‘em out and follow the recipe, or play around with ratios depending on what you’ve got. Click here for the Recipe SWAT Team: Pork Chops.
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egg dumplings
The best part about these protein-packed lil’ thangz is that they’re not manipulated to fall under the category of gluten-free, GAPS, or paleo. They just traditionally are. — Wok Like MeFor more recipes like this one, visit Wok Like Me.
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Add some Chinese chili oil to the Bloody Mary for a spicy kick. The Chinese Chili Bloody Mary is made at China Latina in New York City.
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4
Chinese spareribs, also known as Cantonese BBQ or char siu, are spareribs that are marinated in hoison sauce, soy sauce, and spices and barbecued or roasted.  This chinese spareribs recipe is easily one of our best spareribs recipes due to its ability to deliver the taste and texture of ribs you can typically only find at your local Chinatown. It doesn’t require you buy esoteric ingredients for the marinade or pork. Both Kansas City-style and St.Louis-style spareribs can be used.  Click here to view more of our Best Chinese Recipes. 
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These Chinese-style ribs are served with a sweet, guava barbecue sauce that balances their spicy flavor with a sweet and tart finish.  Recipe contributed by Steven Raichlen for Food & Wine magazine. 
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Jamnation Jams
Our Sublemonal Message is potent and tart – we let the natural flavor of meyer lemons shine – and with the added ginger it makes a delightful glaze for meats or base for sauces. This chicken stir-fry uses those flavors for a quick and memorable entrée.With half a cup of Sublemonal Message you’ll have a delicious dinner for four in no time. The Meyer lemon rind in our marmalade gives this stir-fry a burst of citrus flavor and saves you the time of zesting yourself, and the rice wine vinegar and soy sauce up the savory factor resulting in a balanced, healthy dish.Recipe comes courtesy of Jamnation Jam creator Gillan Reynolds. Click here to check out the full Jamnation lineup of certified Fair Trade artisanal jams.
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Chinese Five Spice Pumpkin Seeds
These Chinese Five Spice Pumpkin Seeds pack a punch with the spice's aromatic flavors. 
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Chinese Chive and Pressed Tofu Turnovers
These chewy-crisp pockets of goodness are fun to make and even better to eat. They are a popular Chinese snack filled with the slight garlicky bite of Chinese chives and the savory depth of seasoned pressed tofu. Clear cellophane noodles add body and egg binds the ingredients together. Some cooks add dried shrimp, but I prefer to avoid muddling the flavors. The turnovers are a great snack or can be served with a bowl of soup, plate of dumplings, and/or a salad. Use regular grocery store flour for the best results. The bit of oil in dough yields a slightly rich finish.   Click here for 5 Unusual Ways to Use Tofu. 
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Chinese Crackling Scallion and Garlic Sauce
In some ways, this recipe epitomizes my passion for simple, fresh sauces. It’s just hot oil infused with garlic and chiles and loaded with sliced scallions. It’s served crackling hot, poured straight from a wok onto whole fish, grilled steaks, roasted potatoes, or even bowls of plain rice. I call it “Chinese” because it reminds me of some of my favorite dishes. It’s part sauce, part condiment, and part stir-fry. The steely perfume of a hot wok or cast-iron skillet is an important ingredient in this preparation. I’ve made this with just about any greens I’ve had on hand. Try it with chopped ramps, kale, bok choy greens, arugula, or garlic chives. Chopped romaine lettuce works too.Make sure all of the ingredients are ready before you start. This is a last-minute preparation that is best made and served immediately.
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