Top Rated Browned Butter Recipes

What's known by pastry chefs as beurre noisette (literally, hazelnut butter) is what makes this Brown Butter Apple Tart so delicious. Click here to see 9 Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes
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5
Davide Luciano​
This very special rendition of the traditional madeleine is made with browned butter and the scraped pulp of a vanilla bean. Its flavor is reminiscent of butterscotch (when I first noticed that, I decided to play it up and included a splash of booze in the recipe). Its texture is precisely what you want in a mad: light when it’s warm (the most delicious temperature for a madeleine) and much like your favorite buttery sponge cake a day later (the most wonderful texture for dunking).While you can make madeleines in small molds of any shape, the classic molds are shell-shaped. By baking the batter in these shallow molds, you get cookies that are beautifully brown on the scalloped side and lightly golden on the plain side. Actually, the plain side isn’t so plain — it’s normally mounded. I say normally, because hundreds of madeleines later, I’ve discovered that the “bumps” can be perfidious — you can’t count on them to turn up reliably. It’s annoying but not tragic, since the flavor and texture are consistently as they should be despite the occasional, always puzzling flatness.Under the theory that it’s impossible to have too many choices when it comes to mads, I urge you to make these beauties, the Classics (see Playing Around).Recipe excerpted from Dorie Greenspan’s newest cookbook Dorie’s Cookies. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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4.5
Davide Luciano​
This very special rendition of the traditional madeleine is made with browned butter and the scraped pulp of a vanilla bean. Its flavor is reminiscent of butterscotch (when I first noticed that, I decided to play it up and included a splash of booze in the recipe). Its texture is precisely what you want in a mad: light when it’s warm (the most delicious temperature for a madeleine) and much like your favorite buttery sponge cake a day later (the most wonderful texture for dunking).While you can make madeleines in small molds of any shape, the classic molds are shell-shaped. By baking the batter in these shallow molds, you get cookies that are beautifully brown on the scalloped side and lightly golden on the plain side. Actually, the plain side isn’t so plain — it’s normally mounded. I say normally, because hundreds of madeleines later, I’ve discovered that the “bumps” can be perfidious — you can’t count on them to turn up reliably. It’s annoying but not tragic, since the flavor and texture are consistently as they should be despite the occasional, always puzzling flatness.Under the theory that it’s impossible to have too many choices when it comes to mads, I urge you to make these beauties, the Classics (see Playing Around).Recipe excerpted from Dorie Greenspan’s newest cookbook Dorie’s Cookies. Click here to purchase your own copy.
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4.5
Chef Stephanie Izard served this delicous, creamy soup at the 2011 CMT Artists of the Year dinner that she had the pleasure of catering. The menu for the event was created by her and inspired by the artists' — Kenny Chesney, Lady Antebellum, Taylor Swift, and others — favorite foods and flavors from the South. This soup in particular was one of Taylor Swift's favorites. 
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4.5
Grilled Oysters with Rosemary Brown Butter
The combination of oysters and rosemary brown butter is always served at Artisan Bistro at the Ritz-Carlton, Boston Common. Click here for Andrew Yeo's interview with JustLuxe.
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4
Salty-sweet browned butter turns this asparagus into a delicious side dish. This is a great item for a holiday menu.  Click here to see 9 Vegetarian Thanksgiving Recipes
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4
Brown Butter Pecan Pie
One of my favorite autumn delights growing up in Texas was fresh pecans. My grandmother would gather the nuts from her pecan trees and bring them on Thanksgiving unshelled to share. The family would sit around, visit cracking pecans and what we didn’t eat right from the shell, we would use for pies.For more great recipes like this one, check out our list of every Thanksgiving pie recipe, ever.
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3.26316
Roasted Brussels Sprouts With Hazelnut Brown Butter
Browning butter brings out a mellow nuttiness that complements the strong flavor of the sprouts, a perfect side dish for Thanksgiving or any other time of year.
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3.25
Peach Cobbler
My first peach cobbler was from a hole-in-the-wall bakery in Old Town Pasadena, a perfect prelude to shopping and a movie on a breezy summer afternoon. This recipe does its best to mimic that creation, with a bit of browned butter and toasted almonds for depth. When possible, the cobbler is best served warm, but always, always top it with a scoop of vanilla. Click here to see Cozy Comfort Food Recipes.  See all peach recipes.
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3.214285
Pumpkin Tortellini with Brown Butter and Sage
Here's a simple preparation for pumpkin tortellini. Starting with store-bought tortellini makes this delicious and elegant dish achievable for the home cook. Use the highest-quality butter you can find, such as unsalted European-style or Irish butter. See all tortellini recipes.
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3.098215
Browned Butter Pecan Tart
I was inspired this year to add some new flavors to my pecan pie. First of all, I made it into a tart because I like the ratio of crust to filling better. Then I browned the butter to add a depth of richness, and bring out a nutty character in the butter. Then I reached for my jar of Lyle’s Golden Syrup, which is like golden, magical sweetness. I know that sounds a little crazy but hear me out. This syrup can be used any time a recipe calls for corn syrup or honey and it adds a unique flavor. It is almost like toffee in liquid form. It tastes buttery, even thought there is no butter in it. If you like caramel/toffee/butterscotch flavors you will love Lyle’s Golden Syrup. It adds more than just sweetness to this tart. Toasting the nuts also adds flavor and texture – they get just a little bit crunchier. Don’t skip that step. I created this in a 7½- by 10½-inch rectangular tart pan, but it will work just as well in a 10-inch round loose-bottom round tart pan. — Dédé Wilson, Founder, Bakepedia
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2.5