Bulgogi (Korean Barbecued Beef)
Bulgogi is a marinated meat dish made with thin slices of beef, usually rib-eye. It is no doubt one of the most well-known Korean dishes to non-Koreans. The important thing is to find the right balance between saltiness and sweetness. Using generous amounts of garlic and sesame oil is important to create authentic bulgogi. The same marinade also can be used for chicken or pork. The best way to enjoy Korean barbecued meat is to wrap a bite-sized piece in a lettuce leaf with a dollop of ssamjang (spice paste) or doenjang (soybean paste).
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Apple Mint Sangria
“For this refreshing summer Sangria, I thought combining fresh mint, apples, and Asian pears with a juicy red would be a dynamite combination,” says Claire Thomas of The Kitchy Kitchen.This recipe is courtesy of The Kitchy Kitchen.
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Gordon Ramsay’s Green Juice
Whether you’re doing a juice cleanse or just want a healthy breakfast drink, green juice can be a bit bitter on the palate —so why not add some flavor with sweet Asian pears and sweet-tart granny Smith apples? Check out Gordon Ramsay on FOX’s Hell’s Kitchen at (8:00 to 9:00 PM ET/PT).
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Kalbi (often spelled galbi) is a marinated, grilled short rib dish that is both tasty and easy to prepare. In South Korea, kalbi is also made with whole short ribs that are butterflied so they remain thin. This style is called wang kalbi (“king ribs”), and the resulting flap of meat attached to the large short rib bone provides for a unique presentation; many kalbi enthusiasts are convinced that this style of kalbi has a superior taste. I find them equally delicious.
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Sometimes we forget about these powerful, medicinal little plants that lend their gorgeous flavor and aroma. Run herbs through your juicer like you would with greens. Mint, chocolate mint, spearmint, and others are beautiful in combination with sweet fruits or greens, and have a cooling effect. I love mint with cucumber, spinach, ruby red grapefruit, and apple. Fennel is another wonderful addition, and whether you’re using the stalks, blub, or fronds (or all three), it will flavor your juice with the sweet and herbal taste of anise. And don’t forget about the savory herbs, basil, thyme, rosemary, sage, oregano, dill, and one and on. These add depth to savory vegetable juices and complexity to sweet and citrusy juices. Look for fresh herbs in your garden, your farmers market, co-op, and grocery store. There’s a lot you can do with a little bit of herbs. One of my favorite summer juices stars lemongrass, which wafts like a bright and sultry perfume through watermelon, Asian pear, and pineapple.
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As a chef, kimchi is such a versatile ingredient in so many ways. Add it to stews, soups, or just eat it by itself. The recipe for the sauce itself can range from hot and sweet to hot and sour. — Larry LaValley, Collective Kitchen at Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa's 3800 Ocean
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Kalbi (Korean Marinated Short Ribs)
Make the marinade a day ahead, and let it sit in the fridge overnight, and then apply it to the meat on the second day.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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Daikon Radish Kimchi
Daikon radish is another common kimchi, which soaks up the marinade phenomenally well and remains addictively crisp for a few days.Recipe courtesy of Stuart Brioza.Reprinted from Koreatown: A Cookbook. Copyright © 2016 by Deuki Hong and Matt Rodbard. Photographs copyright © 2016 by Sam Horine. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.
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Mâche and Asian Pear Salad with Hazelnuts
Mâche is unforgettable. I call it the princess of all leafy greens. The tiny lettuce, when picked young, looks like a rosette, no bigger than a small daisy. Also known as corn salad, field salad, or lamb's lettuce, mâche thrives in cool weather and, contrary to its delicate features, is a pretty hardy little plant. It's also packed with many nutrients. But I will confess that’s not the reason I love mâche. What truly enchants me is its subtle and succulent flavor, which makes for the most elegant salads and garnishes. In this recipe, I serve the mâche with super-thin slices of Asian pear, and toss the tender greens with a shallot and truffle vinaigrette. The sweetness of the petite lettuces harmonizes beautifully with the aromatic pears and the more pungent vinaigrette. See all salad recipes.
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Brisket Bulgogi Sliders with Kimchi Aïoli
These Korean-inspired sliders are popular with the beer served at 508 Gastrobrewery, a gastropub located in New York City. They were also featured at the 2012 Food Network New York City Wine & Food Festival at the Grand Tasting.
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This marinade recipe is a favorite of chef Anthony Meidenbauer because it represents all of the basic flavors of his favorite cuisine: Asian.
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Grilled Nectarines
Pears are a significant source of dietary fiber and vitamin C, and since much of the fiber in the fiber in the pear is insoluble it makes an effective laxative, and nothing slows you down like a sluggish digestive system full of toxins. Coconut milk is loaded with vitamins B, C, and E which boost the immune system and provide energy to cells. It’s also a good source of minerals magnesium, potassium, phosphorous and iron, all of which regulate and support various systems including the heart, the nerves, and red blood cells that carry oxygen to the brain. It’s also rich in antioxidants which help repair the body, eliminate toxins, and keep your energy soaring. And as a note of interest, lemongrass oil has antifungal properties, and, amazingly, it is used to preserve manuscript collections at several institutions in India. If it can keep ancient manuscripts going, maybe it will keep you going too.
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