Top Rated African Recipes

EAST AFRICAN CHICKEN AND LENTIL STEW
This colorful East African chicken and lentil stew offers a new take on a classic Ethiopian doro wat chicken stew. Just be sure to follow the instructions for making the Berbere seasoning blend first, then get to cooking.  Courtesy of McCormick
View Recipe
4.666665
Mango kebab
Bring a bit of West African street food to your kitchen with these beef and chicken kebabs. Just alternate pieces of sliced and seasoned protein with chunks of mango, peppers and potatoes to your tasting and place on the grill. Courtesy of the National Mango Board.
View Recipe
4.5
West African-Style Chicken & Fennel Stew
This West-African style stew may taste like it's been cooking for hours, but all it needs is 30 minutes of cooking and 20 minutes of prep.Courtesy of Campbell Soup Company
View Recipe
4.5
Roasted Vegetable Suya Flatbread
Common in Nigeria, suya is a smokey seasoning made by finely blending roasted peanuts and several spices. For this flatbread recipe, first mix together your homemade suya, make the suya-based sauce and save it as a garnish to the roasted vegetable flatbread. Courtesy of McCormick
View Recipe
4.5
Piri Piri Sauce
This hot pepper sauce is hugely popular in Portugal and its former colonies Cape Verde, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique and Goa, as well as in Britain, the U.S., Australia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. It can be slathered onto chicken, sausages, fish, or seafood before grilling or roasting, or stirred into marinades — you can even use it in place of hot sauce in cocktails such as the Bloody Mary.Chilli peppers were native to South America originally, but piri piri peppers have grown in Africa for centuries, probably travelling across the Atlantic with Portuguese traders and then cross-pollinating to create the tiny spicy chillies we have today.There’s a bit of confusion about whether malegueta, piri piri chillies and African bird’s eye chillies are all exactly the same thing, as often they are labelled interchangeably. Whatever the label says, these are small and pretty fierce, and only used once they turn from green to red. They are extremely hot, which is why I wear gloves to prepare them, and am scrupulous about cleaning up afterwards. (You really, really don’t want to touch delicate skin or your eyes after handling one of these.) I always remove the seeds and ribs of each chilli, but true chilli heads may like to leave them in. The whisky might seem like a strange addition, but it is added for preservation purposes more than for flavour. — Rebecca Seal, author of Lisbon
View Recipe
4.5