Top Rated Bamboo Shoot Recipes

Yangzhou Fried Rice
The city of Yangzhou in eastern Jiangsu Province is one of the ancient centers of Chinese gastronomy and the heartland of what is known as Huaiyang Cuisine. Strangely, only one of its dishes is widely known in the West and that is Yangzhou fried rice, which is on the menu of almost every overseas Cantonese restaurant. A colorful mixture of fragrant rice with diced meat, seafood, and vegetables, it traditionally includes a little sea cucumber and crabmeat as well as fresh bamboo shoots. Many versions, even some of those cooked up in Yangzhou itself, make this dish as a simple fried rice, but the classic recipe, upon which mine is based, includes an injection of chicken stock that adds an extra deliciousness. I have omitted hard-to-find ingredients, such as sea cucumber. I first wrote this recipe for a Chinese New Year's feature in a magazine. One friend told me afterward that it had been such a hit with her children that she had been making it almost once a week ever since, so I've included it here in her honor. Don't worry if you don’t have every ingredient: The key is to have a tempting selection of colors and tastes amid the rice. There's no need to weigh them exactly; just aim to have a small pile (about 3 tablespoons when chopped) of each. Yangzhou fried rice can be served as part of a special Chinese meal, or as a whole meal in itself, perhaps with simply a salad or a lightly cooked green vegetable on the side. Click here to see Regional Chinese Cooking Made Easy.  
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5
This rich, earthy soup is given the perfect amount of tang from soy sauce and ginger. To make it vegetarian, substitute the chicken stock with vegetable stock. Click here to see more spring soup recipes. 
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5
Recipe excerpted from The Meat Free Monday Cookbook
 In just a few decades, Thai food has grown from relative obscurity into one of the most popular cuisines on Earth. This vegetable curry has many of its classic tastes and textures.The Meat Free Monday Cookbook edited by Annie Rigg © 2016 Kyle Books, and the photographs © Tara Fisher. Hardcover edition originally published in April 2012. No images may be used, in print or electronically, without written consent from the publisher.
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4.5
DL Acken
Recipe excerpted with permission from China: The Cookbook by Kei Lum and Diora Fong Chan. Click here to purchase your own copy. 
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4.5
Little Passports
“There are hundreds of varieties of dumplings or ‘jiaozi,’ in China. Jiaozi are filled with meat or fish and used to be served on festive occasions, like the Chinese New Year, weddings, and special parties. Today, jiaozi are a popular throughout the year, but they haven’t lost their meaning and are still very special. Jiaozi symbolize wealth, fortune and family.”This recipe is courtesy of Little Passports, a children's media company that creates monthly educational subscriptions for kids.
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4.5
Salmon with Green Curry Sauce
This salmon recipe is adapted from one of my favorite dishes to make, Thai Green Curry Chicken. It's a great, easy dinner-for-two weeknight option. Click here to see The New and Improved Farm-Raised Salmon story.
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4
Moo Shu Pork Recipe
This popular dish is often served at Chinese restaurants with hot pancakes or crepes. It's easier to make at home than you think — and you can even replace the pork with chicken or shrimp. Hoisin sauce is the key to this dish with its depth of color and sweet and salty taste. It can be found in the Asian section of your grocery store.
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4
Tangerine Halibut Salad with Snow Peas and Mushrooms
The easy to digest protein in halibut has an amino acid ratio that’s conducive to lean muscle development. The more muscle you have, the faster your metabolism gets.— Haylie Pomroy For more metabolism boosting foods, click here! 
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4
Har Gow
Also known as xiao jiao, these shrimp dumplings, along with char siu bao, shumai, and sesame balls, are the workhorse of a typical dim sum establishment. These are easy enough to make at home on a Saturday evening to serve on Sunday morning, a popular time for Chinese families to partake in dim sum. Click here to see Have Some Dim Sum at Home.
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4
Egg Foo Young
What is egg foo young? A Chinese fritatta, basically. Plus, with a big helping of veggies, you get an easy, healthy meal that's a departure from your everyday omelette. Substitute any of the vegetables in this recipe for other favorites, like bean sprouts or steamed bok choy. Make it heartier by chopping up some cooked Chinese sausage, ham, or shrimp to add to the egg foo young mixture. To make a nice, rich egg foo young sauce, I made a simple roux and flavored it with soy sauce and rice wine vinegar, although a more traditional version uses broth and cornstarch for a gravy.  Click here to see What Are Heirloom Eggs?
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3.5
spring rolls
You’ve probably heard of jiaozi, or dumplings, the ubiquitous Chinese food that nearly every family eats during the week-long celebration of the Chinese New Year. Boiled, steamed, or pan-fried, the dumplings are easy to make ahead and can be frozen in large quantities to preserve the tradition of fun and relaxation that characterizes a New Year’s holiday spent at home with family. Spring rolls are popular all over the world, but they have special significance as a traditional Chinese New Year food, particularly south of the Yangtze River. These “spring pancakes” are easy to make and can be wrapped around a variety of fillings. 
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2.934785
Originally eaten by Buddhists in Chinese culture, this dish is served in most Chinese households during the first few days of the new year. There are regional differences depending upon which part of China your family originates from, but most of the dried ingredients remain consistent since they symbolize good luck. A number of the ingredients like the black fungus (fat choy), lily buds (jinzhen), and gingko nuts (bai guo) all symbolize wealth and good fortune. Eating vegetarian the first day of new year also symbolizes purification of the body and upholds the tradition of having no animal slaughter on the first day of the new year.Authentically, this dish contains 18 ingredients. The number symbolizes wealth and prosperity. The stew requires quite a bit of time for reconstituting, boiling, and braising. Most of the prep time is spent rinsing and soaking dried ingredients and then slowly braising the ingredients until the flavor melds.Click here to see The Ultimate Chinese New Year Dinner.
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2.4