Slideshow: 20 Things Only People From Brooklyn Say

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How many of these Brooklyn sayings do you know?
RATCHET

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“Antics”

“Antics”

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In Brooklyn, the word “antics” isn’t used by its dictionary definition of “amusing, silly, or strange behavior.” It’s mostly used to ask about the details of a plan. “What are the antics for tonight?” would, in this case, be an inquiry regarding the coming evening’s activities.

“Bodied”

“Bodied”

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To understand this term, you’ll have to know what it means to “slay.” Because if you “bodied” something, that means you slayed it. Confused? Think of it as a way of saying your achievement with regard to some task was absolutely amazing and great all around. For instance: “Beyoncé bodied that Grammys performance.”

“Blowing Minds”

“Blowing Minds”

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“Blowing minds” can be used both positively and negatively, depending on the situation. If you do something ridiculous, upset someone, or surprise someone, you’re likely “blowing minds.”

“Brick”

“Brick”

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We’ve all stepped out on a freezing cold day and felt like a solid block of ice. Well, that’s exactly what the term “brick” means. When someone says it’s “brick” outside they mean everything is frozen solid.

“Dragging It”

“Dragging It”

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If you’re told you’re “dragging it” then that means you’re exaggerating. Let’s say you saw a celebrity on the street, and you tell the story as if the two of you are now best friends. The responses will probably be: “You’re dragging it!”

“Going With” / “Went With”

“Going With” / “Went With”

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The terms “going with” and “went with” are used to describe people who are dating. It may be self-explanatory, but “going with” is used to describe current relationships whereas “went with” is used to describe past relationships.

“Good Looks”

“Good Looks”

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If in a conversation someone says “good looks” to you, they’re not commenting on your appearance — they’re thanking you. Much like the older phrase “good looking out,” it is an informal way of saying: “Thanks for looking out for me.”  

“I’m Dead” / “I’m Weak”

“I’m Dead” / “I’m Weak”

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When you do or say something hilarious, you’ll likely hear a Brooklynite say “I’m dead” or “I’m weak” instead of actually laughing. Basically, users of the phrase are claiming something was so funny that laughter has killed or weakened them — strange, since usually they’re not actually laughing. It’s a thing.

“It’s Lit” / “Lituation”

“It’s Lit” / “Lituation”

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A bit more universal these days than some of the other sayings on this list, “it’s lit” is used to explain that you’re having a good time. If your friends in Brooklyn are trying to convince you to go to a party or event, they’d probably say you won’t want to miss it because it’s going to “be lit.” If an event is getting wild, it may be called a “lituation.”

“Mad”

 “Mad”

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To add emphasis or exaggeration to a sentence, people from Brooklyn will use the word “mad.” You might hear this one throughout New York City, but don’t think the person is upset with you! They’re just really emphasizing their feelings. For instance: “I’m mad hungry right now.”

“My Bad”

“My Bad”

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When you hear someone from Brooklyn say “my bad,” they’re apologizing for something they’ve done or said — but not because they want to. “My bad” is used when someone knows he or she should apologize to save face but isn’t genuinely sorry.

“Not gon’ hold you”

“Not gon’ hold you”

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The phrase “not gon’ hold you” means the speaker has no intention of interfering with whatever you’re about to do or say. It isn’t necessarily negative, and could even be encouraging. But whatever it is you are planning, no one will put forth any effort to hold you back dissuade you. 

“OD”

“OD”

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You’ll hear this term used several ways depending on the context, but you’ll likely never hear someone use the full word “overdosing.” If you say something surprising someone may say to you: “OD?” This means roughly the same as: “Seriously? Are you kidding?” You’ll also hear it used when you’re saying more than you should; for instance, if you’re going overboard with details in a story or adding more than necessary to it, someone may call you out by saying “OD!” or “You’re OD’ing!”

“Put me on”

“Put me on”

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When someone from Brooklyn uses the phrase “put me on” they’re asking you to tell them what happened. For example, if you share on social media that you’ve had a bad day and they comment “put me on,” it means they want you to explain the situation further.

“Pop Off” / “Poppin’”

“Pop Off” / “Poppin’”

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This saying can be used in various ways depending on the tone and context of the conversation. It can either mean someone is getting really angry — as in “I’m about to pop off” — or it can be used to ask someone what’s happening — as in “What’s poppin’?”

“Ratchet”

“Ratchet”

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“Ratchet” is a word used in Brooklyn that has spread to most millennials’ vocabulary. If something is referred to as “ratchet” — be it a person, place, or object — that means it is classless and unsophisticated.

“Shmoney”

“Shmoney”

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This one isn’t so much a slang word as it is a funny way to say money. If your friends are going on a trip during the work week and you can’t go they might tell you to “get that shmoney”— as in “We understand that you have to work and make money.”

“Sis”

 “Sis”

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Yes, we all know that “sis” is short for sister, but in Brooklyn it can be used when speaking to anyone that you’re telling to relax.  You may hear it used as an imperative — for instance “Chill, sis!” — or on its own, just indicating that you need to relax.

“Snuff”

“Snuff”

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The word “snuff” is used in place of punching or hitting someone. If people are talking about a fight, you’ll hear it used in sentences similar to: “That person got snuffed.”

“Tight”

“Tight”

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If someone from Brooklyn tells you that they’re “tight,” then they are seriously upset. You can think of it as being wound up, or tightening up as your anger builds inside.