Lucky New Year's Eve
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10 New Year’s Recipes That Will Bring You Good Luck

Luck be the legumes
Lucky New Year's Eve
DGLimages/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Head into the new year with as much luck as you can muster or, in this case, as much luck as you can cook or bake into your favorite holiday sides, entrees, drinks and desserts. According to cultures and traditions from across the country and around the world, various ingredients symbolize prosperity, longevity and goodwill. Here are 10 recipes to cook up for good luck and good food in the new year.

Grapes

Grapes
Courtesy of McCormick

As the clock strikes midnight in Spain, families hold off on celebratory toasts and champagne and instead rush to pop 12 grapes into their mouths in 12 seconds. Each grape represents good luck for a single month of the year. The more you eat, the luckier you will be. It’s best to use seedless grapes come midnight, but you can enjoy these caramel-coated grapes in the last hours before the new year.

For the Salted Caramel Dipped Grapes recipe, click here.

Pork

Pork
Chris Walker/Chicago Tribune; Shannon Kinsella/food styling

In several cultures worldwide, pigs are symbolic of prosperity and wealth. Transfer some of their luck over to yourself by enjoying a pork-based entree this New Year’s Eve. We recommend a tangy and tender roasted pork dish. However, you should know this is not a quick one-hour dinner. You will need 11 hours of roast time, so plan accordingly.

For the Slow-Roasted, Chile-Crusted Pork recipe, click here.

Black-eyed peas

Black-eyed peas
Nadir Keklik/Shutterstock

Coin-shaped black-eyed peas are another lucky New Year’s staple. Like pork, black-eyed peas represent humility and prosperity. Save time by preparing yours in an Instant Pot. Then, incorporate the cooked peas into hoppin’ john, a classic one-pot Southern New Year’s Day dish of peas, ham and rice.

For the Instant Pot Black-Eyed Peas recipe, click here.

Pork and black-eyed peas

Pork and black-eyed peas
Courtesy of the Idaho Potato Commission and recipe author Betsy Haley

Double your luck by combining ham and black-eyed peas in one super slow-cooker soup. This hearty and protein-packed recipe requires little effort. Just combine all your ingredients and let the slow cooker get to work.

For the Ham, Black-Eyed Pea and Idaho Potato Slow Cooker Soup recipe, click here.

Pomegranate

Pomegranate
Courtesy of Margaritaville Resort Orlando

What’s New Year’s Eve without a holiday cocktail? Add a necessary dose of good fortune to your flute of prosecco in the form of 1 ounce of pomegranate juice. In Greek culture, the pomegranate is considered a symbol of life, fertility, health and happiness. They are gifted or opened on New Year’s Day across the country. 

For the New Year’s Sparkler recipe, click here.

Soba

Soba
Courtesy of Ready Set Eat

Each New Year’s Eve in Japan, families slurp soba, a buckwheat noodle. The noodle’s stringy length symbolizes longevity and prosperity. You can make this international dish at home no matter where you live. Just stir cooked soba noodles into a spicy tomato broth and serve alongside tender codfish.

For the Cod with Soba Noodles in Spicy Tomato Broth recipe, click here.

Collard greens

Collard greens
Courtesy of McCormick

Cooked green veggies are meant to represent lots of increased wealth in your new year. Bring this iconic Southern dish to your New Year’s table and serve with crispy bacon bites.

For the Collard Greens With Bacon recipe, click here.

Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut
E. Jason Wambsgans/Chicago Tribune; Shannon Kinsella/Food styling

Cabbage is another green-like-money ingredient to fit into your New Year’s Eve menu. Serve it up in these simple crispy sauerkraut and ham fritters. Along with the fritters, this recipe also includes an accompanying smoky mustard dill dip

For the Crispy Sauerkraut-Ham Fritters recipe, click here.

Ring-shaped cake

Ring-shaped cake
Courtesy of The Incredible Egg

Celebrate a year coming full-circle by whipping up a ring-shaped cake. You can choose a boxed cake mix as your base or a more ambitious homemade recipe like this entirely possible impossible bundt cake.

For the Daredevil's Impossible Bundt Cake recipe, click here.

Lentils

Lentils
Courtesy of Instant Pot

Lentils are the final lucky legume you can eat during the new year. Plate yours alongside a poached egg and green spinach for an extra lucky New Year’s Day breakfast. If you’re looking for other dishes to kick off your new year, you can always enjoy one of our 50 best brunch recipes

For the Lentils and Poached Eggs recipe, click here.

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