Foods To Avoid If You Have Seasonal Allergies from Foods To Avoid If You Have Seasonal Allergies

Foods To Avoid If You Have Seasonal Allergies

Contributor

Foods To Avoid If You Have Seasonal Allergies

Foods To Avoid If You Have Seasonal Allergies
Shutterstock

If you can’t stop sneezing and your throat feels itchy, you’re not alone; according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology more than thirty percent of adults and forty percent of children suffer from these types of seasonal nasal allergies, and that number continues to grow. Click here for the full story.

Blue Cheese

Shutterstock

Blue cheese is rich in histamines and can lead to a wide variety of symptoms like itchy, watery eyes, sneezing, and nasal congestion.
 

Parsley

Shutterstock

If you are allergic to tree pollens like alder or birch, you may want to avoid parsley; it’s a known cross-reactor meaning it can make your seasonal allergies worse during peak season.   
 

Tomatoes

Shutterstock

Both rich in histamines and a known cross-reactor with grass pollens, tomatoes can be a bad choice during peak allergy season. If your symptoms seem to be worsening, you may want to consider avoiding tomatoes.


 

Almonds

Shutterstock

Almonds are known to worse tree-pollen allergies among sufferers. During the height of allergy season, consider avoiding these nuts and any products made with them, like almond milk or almond-flour cookies.
 

Wine

Shutterstock

Because it’s made from fermented grapes, wine is rich in allergy-inducing histamines. Wine is also a source of sulfites which can provoke asthma and other allergy-like symptoms. Bad news for seasonal allergy sufferers!

Banana

Shutterstock

If you’re coughing and sneezing throughout the fall, you may want to consider avoiding bananas; they are known to worsen symptoms of ragweed allergy.

Celery

Celery Sticks
Shutterstock

Celery is used to flavor a number of dishes. Unfortunately, it can make tree-pollen and weed-pollen allergy symptoms worse. If your seasonal allergies are worsening, you may want to try avoiding celery.
 

Chamomile Tea

Shutterstock

For many, hot tea can help reduce coughing during allergy seasons. But, if you’re allergic to ragweed, avoid chamomile tea as it can actually cause symptoms to worsen.

Click for full story
Foods To Avoid If You Have Seasonal Allergies