Romani Tea is the same as Russian Tea, and is traditionally served with sugar, lemon, fruit, or jam. According to Hancock, many Russian and Eastern European Romani dishes are the same as the region’s  because the Roma in the East have been settled for so long, whereas Roma in Western Europe were nomadic for longer, so the cuisine is more insular and includes a wide selection of game and foraged vegetables, herbs, and berries. At tea time, my grandmother and I like to read each other’s tea leaves, but this is somewhat unusual among Roma. While the women in her family were traditionally dancers and fortune tellers, for Roma, fortune telling (drabaripé) is just commonsense advice (or Samaritan therapy) for gadjé and is not usually taken seriously within the community. Obviously Roma are not innately born with psychic powers; rather, it’s a trade that was born out of poverty and discrimination and practiced in desperate times. However, Roma do believe in healing magic or rituals, called advising, and practice that within the community. Advisors must be able to speak Rromanes, but because our family lost the language in the Holocaust, we’ve mish-mashed elements of drabaripé and advising: we practice tea leaf reading, palm reading, and card reading alongside meditation and energy healing to treat each other (and sometimes clients) holistically. This is an example of how it’s difficult to make generalizations about Roma — we’re all different, and each family will have its own unique kind of Romani culture (just like everyone else in the world). These “tealeaf afternoons” as my grandmother and I came to call them, are a lovely way to unwind with a loved one and speak frankly about what’s going on in each other’s lives.You will need a teapot, two round shallow-bottom teacups (preferably white or a light solid color inside), two saucers, and two spoons. If you want to read the leaves, find a teapot without a sieve, or you can just spoon some tea leaves from the pot back into the tea once you’ve filled your cup.Read How to Eat Like a Real Gypsy here 
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Pooja Mattl, author of The 3 Day Reset, has high praise for this green tea variation: “For those unfamiliar with the flavor of green tea or those who find it too bitter, this kind of green tea offers a more palatable alternative as the beautiful, strong aroma and flavor of jasmine offsets the bitterness and at the same time, captivates the senses.”  Read more about How Iced Tea Can Help You Stay Slim  
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Woojeon is the "first flush" of green tea picked in South Korea, meaning that it is the earliest picked in the season. The leaves are therefore tender, delicate, and rarer than later-picked leaves. Remember to pay attention to both the temperature and the timing — if the tea steeps for too long, the flavor will turn bitter.
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Green Tea Toddy
Emphasize the tea aspect of this classic cocktail by infusing bourbon and sparkling water with green tea. This latest take on the hot toddy stands out from the pack while still being incredibly easy to replicate at home.This recipe is courtesy of Sparkling Ice.
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Dutch Tea
Numi created a rich, chocolatey tea that is great on its own, but even better when mixed with Dutch chocolate vodka and cream. Served hot and with a dollop of cream, it’s a great ending to any meal.
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G Tea
A hot cup of tea is great when enjoyed alone, so, why not add one of America's favorite liquors? This cocktail features Earl Grey, chai, and rooibos tea with a splash of gin.This recipe was created by Tim Wells from the Revival Social Club.
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Grilled Mahimahi Recipe
Guanabána tea is a refreshing and energizing way to begin the day. Click here to see The Amazing G-Fruit and Ways to Use It.
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Don’t refrigerate this too quickly or the tea might cloud. Cloudy tea is still delicious, but it’s not as pretty to look at, and iced tea is so perfect for guests that you want it to look ideal. You can alter this recipe as you see fit. Read more about Making the Best Iced Tea.
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Also called rooibos, this tea hails from the desert area of Southern Africa. The evergreen shrub of the pea family reduces anxiety and stress while elevating your mood and encouraging restful sleep. Read more about 12 Teas That Boost Your Mood  
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This cocktail (pictured middle) gets the moniker "Southern" based on the addition of Maker's Mark Bourbon. The whiskey barrel-aged bitters used does not add bitterness but rather brings out the cinnamon-spiced character of the tea. Click here to find more "tea-tails" for winter.
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alcoholic tea punch
Alcohol level-light, light sweet Exotic Blooming tea punch is inspired by original punch which had been quaffed by sailors, explorers and patriots for centuries. The word punch either comes from Indian word “panch”, the Sanskrit word “panchan” or the Persian word “panj”, all meaning five, from the fact that this drink is made of five ingredients: tea (bitter), sugar (sweet), lemons (sour), water (weak) and arrack (alcoholic).
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Chamomile is an effective acid neutralizer that also aids in relaxation. Ginger helps repair inflammation, eases nausea, and settles the stomach. Sip this tea hot or cold and let it soothe your burning tummy.
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