Used to Be Called Mothering Sunday from 10 Things You Didn’t Know About Mother’s Day

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Mother’s Day

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Used to Be Called Mothering Sunday

While the modern American Mother’s Day didn’t evolve until years later, the most clear precursor to the holiday was the Christian celebration of “Mothering Sunday.” In the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, Mothering Sunday fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent, where parishioners would return to their “mother” church.

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Mother’s Day: The Early Years

The roots of the modern Mother’s Day predate the Civil War. Ann Reeves Jarvis began “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children. Jarvis later organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” a peaceful movement where mothers convened with former Union and Confederate soldiers. Other proponents of Mother’s Day were Julia Ward Howe who wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” in hopes of uniting mother’s to stand for world peace. She later petitioned for June 2nd to be recognized as “Mother’s Peace Day.” Activist Juliet Calhoun Blakely began a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Mich. during the 1870s. Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering also worked to organize an official Mothers’ Day.

 

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The First Mother’s Day

After the death of Ann Reeves Jarvis in 1908, her daughter Anna Jarvis sought to host a celebration to thank mothers everywhere for all they do. She held the first Mother’s Day celebration in a Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia with financial backing from Philadelphia retail owner John Wanamaker. Thousands also congregated in Philadelphia at Wanamaker’s retail store for a Mother’s Day celebration of their own.

 

 

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Why the Date Changes.

After Jarvis successfully held her first Mother’s Day, she sought out to make it a national celebration. After years of lobbying, she finally got the attention of President Woodrow Wilson in 1914. He proclaimed that the second Sunday in May, no matter what the date, would belong to moms across the nation. 

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The Founder Was Not a Mother

Jarvis, though she founded the American modern concept of Mother’s Day, remained unmarried and childless throughout her entire life. 

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It is Revolutionary

Coretta Scott King, the wife of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., organized a march on Mother’s Day in 1968 in support of underprivileged women and children. In the 1970s, women’s rights activists also used Mother’s Day to raise equality awareness 

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It is a “Hallmark Holiday”

Well in the most literal sense of the notion. Roughly 65 percent of all greeting card sales occur five days before Mother’s Day, and they purchase more than one card for mom. We are sure the other 35 percent are all handmade cards.

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“Moms” the Word Around the World

All over the world, mothers have their own version of Mother’s Day that occurs at various times of the year. Also, a “vast” amount of world languages’ word for “mother” begins with the letter “m.” 

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Spare No Expense

Mom’s value is immeasurable, but according to the National Retail Federation 2013 survey, consumers will spend an average of $168.94 on mom. Heck, she deserves it, right?

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Most Popular Gifts

Around the nation moms are receiving the following on their special day:

Cards - 82 percent, Flowers - 65 percent, Dinner - 52 percent, Gift Card - 34 percent, Clothes - 28 percent, Jewelry - 26 percent, CD/Books - 21 percent, Housewares - 15 percent, Personal Care - 14 percent, Electronics - 9 percent

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10 Things You Didn’t Know About Mother’s Day