The Daily Dish

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The Daily Dish: Cow Escapes Slaughterhouse, Goes to Taco Bell

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Dishing out the latest in food news
The Daily Dish

Sehrgute Fotos / Shutterstock

Learn more about what is hot and trending in the world of food and drink.

Cow Escapes Slaughterhouse, Goes to Taco Bell

Last week, a cow’s nearly two-hour taste of freedom ended at none other than a busy Taco Bell on South Main Street in Weatherford, Texas. The cow escaped the Hamilton Meats butcher shop and led police officers and animal control workers on a lengthy chase throughout the city, the Star-Telegram reported. Two civilians on horseback wrangled the cow in front of a unit of the fast-food chain after it rammed into a police car, and the cow was returned to the butcher. The chase was recorded on a dash cam and has since gone viral on Facebook, reaching more than 6 million views.


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Microfibers From Fleece Jackets Might Be Making Its Way Into Your Food

A recent study revealed that every time fuzzy jackets and pullovers made with microscopic plastic fibers (microfibers) are washed, pieces of plastic get dispelled into the environment. So, are these microfibers making their way into our food, too? Outdoor clothing company Patagonia partnered with research groups and found that with each wash of a jacket, two grams of microfibers were shed, NPR reported. As the water is drained away (along with the microfibers), it is taken to a wastewater plant where many fibers aren’t filtered out. According to studies, synthetic microfibers have been spotted in table salt in China, and even in fish caught in California, but the effects of these microfibers on humans and wildlife are still being examined. "If you're eating fish, you're eating plastic," Gregg Treinish, founder and executive director of the nonprofit Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, told NPR. 


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South Pacific Island Aims to Ban Imported Junk Food to Improve Citizens’ Health

The South Pacific island Torba Province in the Republic of Vanuatu is making moves to create a healthier lifestyle for its citizens with the goal of putting a halt to imported junk food. Last week, community leader and head of the local tourism council Father Luc Dini worked with local chefs and tourism bungalows to start serving guests only locally grown, organic food, The Guardian reported. Over the next two years, the plan is to eventually ban all imported food and become the first organic province in Vanuatu. “It is easy to boil noodles or rice, but they have almost no nutritional value and there is no need to eat imported food when we have so much local food grown organically on our islands,” Dini told The Guardian. Some of the island’s locally grown or sourced food includes fish, crabs, shellfish, taro, yams, paw paw, and pineapple, Dini said.


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Denver Brewers Behind ‘Pussy Riot’ Beer Gear Up for More Tapping Events

Last month, a group of female brewers created “Makin Noise: A Pussy Riot Beer” to protest President Donald Trump’s inauguration, and the success of the imperial saison has prompted other Colorado brewers to plan more philanthropic tapping events. The brewing events, organized by co-brewers Bess Dougherty and Kelissa Hieber, and bars that stocked the beer raised more than $4,300 (including a few private donations), which was donated to charities including Planned Parenthood and the ACLU, according to Westword. Three more tapping events are in the works so far on April 22, July 22, and Oct. 19, with anywhere between five to seven brewers collaborating at each event.


Dessert Goals

Dessert Goals Festival Comes Back to Brooklyn This Spring

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The upcoming spring is about to get a little sweeter: Dessert Goals is returning to Williamsburg, Brooklyn on March 25 and 26. After last year’s successful dessert festival, this year’s early-bird tickets sold out in a matter of minutes. However, general admission tickets will be available online on March 7 at noon for $15 and $50 for workshops. All tickets are designated for a one and a half hour time slot — more than enough time to eat all the desserts your heart desires and indulge in the additional programming.