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The ‘Brooklyn’ in Every State
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The ‘Brooklyn’ in Every State

The ‘Brooklyn’ in Every State

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Like it or not, hipsters have gone national. And whether you hate them or love them, you can’t deny that they tend to know where the best bars are, which restaurants are the most Instagram-worthy, and which farmers markets to hit up for organic and locally-sourced products. Whereas hipsters are traditionally associated with Brooklyn, of course — but at this point you can find a “Brooklyn,” a haven of hipsterdom, in every one of the 50 states (as well as in the nation’s capital).

So when looking for the Brooklyn of each state, we used multiple resources. Movehub created a highly intriguing “hipster index,” which took a look at the 150 most populous cities in America and their density of microbreweries, tattoo parlors, thrift shops, and vegan stores, as well as their year on year rent demand increase. However, the very counter-culture attitude of hipsters often means they have a soft spot for smaller cities, which we didn’t want to ignore. Taking into account Movehub’s findings, our own knowledge of the general reputation certain areas have, as well as the opinions of Daily Meal staff members whose home states span the country, we found that the Brooklyns of some states were specific neighborhoods, boroughs, or districts, whereas others were entire towns. Whether you’re looking for a place with the trendiest food, art, and cultural scene or hoping to feed into your own inner hipster, here is our list of the “Brooklyn” of every state.

Alabama: Huntsville

Alabama: Huntsville

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With an 8.55 percent year on year increase in rent demand, the city of Huntsville, Alabama, is booming. There are multiple festivals held here every year, and the city has many performance arts groups that have been around for at least 50 years, as well as an arts council dedicated to keeping the art scene here alive. Huntsville also has a ton of thrift stores, coffee shops, and breweries that really give it that Brooklyn vibe.

Alaska: Spenard, Anchorage

Alaska: Spenard, Anchorage

Michael S./Yelp

Once a separate municipality, the Anchorage neighborhood of Spenard often still feels that way with its own distinct culture and sense of community. They even have a “Spenardi Gras” celebrating just that. Spenard is known for its artistic and “bohemian” residents, and the kind of shops that have organic food, used books, and other hipster-friendly ware. Craft beer is big here, as are coffee shops and artisanal bakeries, and music shows and poetry jams are quite common as well.

Arizona: Tucson

Arizona: Tucson

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A diverse city with a strong artistic scene and fantastic Southwestern cuisine, Tucson is a must for anyone visiting Arizona. The Sonoran Dog, a unique hot dog wrapped in bacon and griddled until crispy and stuffed into a split-top bun, is one of the best hot dogs in the country and can be found at El Güero Canelo. You’ll also find the best doughnuts in Arizona at Young Donuts in Tucson, which also has a lively nightlife. Tucson is pretty big on wine, so you’ll have to try some at its many wineries or one of its great bars such as Kon Tiki Restaurant Lounge, also the best in the state.

Arkansas: Bentonville

Arkansas: Bentonville

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The town of Bentonville is an interesting mix of that Southern, small town feel and modern globalization thanks to its location in the Mid-South and the noticeable presence of the Walmart headquarters. All of this comes together to create a complex culture that Arkansas hipsters seem to flock to. An impressive art museum and film festival encourage a strong creative scene and the local food scene is filled with hot spots of culinary sophistication. Bentonville also has over 50 miles of trails and 22 parks for all your hipster hiking and biking needs.

California: Silver Lake, Los Angeles

California: Silver Lake, Los Angeles

BootieSF m./Yelp

Los Angeles’ Silver Lake neighborhood is known for its hipsterdom, a bastion of independent coffee shops, restaurants, and hipster boutiques. It’s been the heart of the alternative music scene in Los Angeles since the 1990s, and is often referred to as the “Williamsburg of the West.”

Colorado: Denver

Colorado: Denver

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Over the past decade or so, Denver has grown into a center of culture and arts that is a haven for Colorado hipsters seeking their own Brooklyn kind of scene. You’ll find plenty of city life here, but the Rocky Mountains are right nearby for when one craves the great outdoors, as hipsters are wont to do. The city’s parks and gardens are also quite beautiful. Brewery tours are popular in Denver (the city leads the country with 8.8 microbreweries for every 100,000 people), and there’s even a private cannabis tour for those looking to truly enjoy the legality of marijuana in the state.

Connecticut: East Rock, New Haven

Connecticut: East Rock, New Haven

Mila C./Yelp

New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood is a popular place for Yale students and young professionals, giving rise to a very hipster-friendly scene. The creativity of university students means a community that values the visual and performing arts, as well as coffee houses, such as Coffee Pedaler, where creative minds can meet. Take your bicycle down the city bike lane that goes through the neighborhood to one of the area’s many independent restaurants and bars, specialty grocery stores, or the farmers market.

Delaware: Trolley Square, Wilmington

Delaware: Trolley Square, Wilmington

Sarah L./Yelp

It’s not a whole lot like Brooklyn, but it’s probably the closest Delaware’s got. Wilmington’s Trolley Square is probably the most popping part of the city, with plenty of trendy restaurants and bars full of young professionals. What really draws a strong comparison to places like Brooklyn, however, is the presence of the Delaware Local Food Exchange, where you can buy organic products from sustainable local farms, as well as tons of handcrafted, vegan, and local goodies.

Florida: Wynwood, Miami

Florida: Wynwood, Miami

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The Wynwood neighborhood of Miami is a cultural mecca of the city, with an art district, fashion district, and technology district all present here. One of the largest open-air street art installations in the world, Wynwood Art District brings in plenty of creative minds with its five museums, 70 galleries, seven art complexes, 12 art studios, three collections, and five art fairs. Huge investments and development projects have greatly gentrified the neighborhood in the past decade, and there are plenty of breweries and award-winning restaurants to explore here as well.

Georgia: Little Five Points, Atlanta

Georgia: Little Five Points, Atlanta

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Little Five Points’ major contribution to the city of Atlanta is the neighborhood’s alternative culture. Here you’ll find independent bookstores, record stores, coffee shops, thrift shops, and all kinds of things to cater to the indie or new-age crowd. Multiple venues here give rise to a thriving music scene, and street art is a staple of the neighborhood’s décor.

Hawaii: Chinatown, Honolulu

Hawaii: Chinatown, Honolulu

Ryan T./Yelp

Honolulu’s Chinatown is one of the oldest Chinatowns in the country, and it’s a hipster’s paradise. Not only is there tons of delicious East Asian food and plenty of trendy bars, but on the first Friday of every month, the Chinatown Artists Lofts — where many local artists live and work — opens itself to the public to showcase the work of these artists as well as provide a place for hanging out, listening to music, and drinking. If you’re here any other time of the year, you can also check out the art deco Hawaii Theater or one of the many independent art galleries in the district. Chinatown is also home to the KCC Farmers’ Market as well as other markets selling East Asian and Hawaiian antiques and crafts.

Idaho: Boise

Idaho: Boise

Boise Fry Company/Yelp

Boise has found its groove, and its place as one of America’s rising destinations, thanks to great breweries, wine, food, and an accompanying pleasant climate. Eat some of America’s best steak at Chandlers and the most delicious fries at Boise Fry Company in what is actually one of the safest cities in the world. Boise is in the top four among U.S. states for thrift stores (9.9 per 100,000 people) and tattoo parlours (5.8 per 100,000 people), making it a great place for hipsters to thrive. Outdoor adventures abound here, as well, and Boise is a great place to go hiking, rock climbing, mountain biking, kayaking, and more.

Illinois: Wicker Park, Chicago

Illinois: Wicker Park, Chicago

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The Wicker Park neighborhood of Chicago’s West Town has seen a lot of gentrification in recent years, giving rise to many hipster-friendly spots such as independent grocers, restaurants, cafés, boutiques, and music venues. You’ll find plenty of clothing stores that sell that Brooklyn look, as well as art galleries and artisan stores.

Indiana: Fountain Square, Indianapolis

Indiana: Fountain Square, Indianapolis

White Rabbit Cabaret/Yelp

Many artists from the Indianapolis area have found the perfect place to live and work in the cultural district of Fountain Square. Art galleries and studios are not uncommon here, and you can find some great live entertainment at the Murphy Art Center or the White Rabbit Cabaret, which features cabaret shows, stand-up routines, and indie films. At the Fountain Square Theatre Building, you’ll find a historic diner and bowling alley, as well as the chance to join the swing dance community that’s been building up here. There are plenty of trendy food spots both here and elsewhere in the district, where you’ll also find the Fountain Square Brewing Company among other watering holes. 

Iowa: Des Moines

Iowa: Des Moines

Sue T./Yelp

An article in The Atlantic a few years ago declared that the most hipster thing you could possibly do is move to Des Moines. And it’s true, even a few years later, Des Moines really does have a Brooklyn-like reputation within the state, due to the young and artistic community that thrives in a city that is home to multiple performing arts organizations and venues as well as a prolific food scene that’s the best in the state. Quirky bars and independent coffee shops may not be the first thing you think of when you think of this Midwestern town, but that would only be because you haven’t been there.

Kansas: Lawrence

Kansas: Lawrence

The Bourgeois Pig/Yelp

A quirky town full of Midwestern charm and full to the fedora brim with a rich culture of arts, music, sports, and more, Lawrence benefits from being home to both the University of Kansas and Haskell Indian Nations University. Check out Lawrence Busker Fest, a huge gathering of street performers, or come for the Free State Festival, an arts and film festival, or the Haskell Indian Art Market. There are also plenty of hipster-friendly hideouts like The Bourgeois Pig, a popular coffeehouse and bar.

Kentucky: The Highlands, Louisville

Kentucky: The Highlands, Louisville

Allison F./Yelp

The Brooklyn of Kentucky is located in an area of Louisville known as the Highlands. The food scene here is so prolific that locals know it as “Restaurant Row,” with plenty of trendy spots like Holy Grale, a gastropub with a beer garden. The area also has a reputation for stores full of antiques and quirky trinkets. Louisville’s music scene thrives here as well in the area’s many nightclubs and bars, and there are plenty of local breweries for you to visit too.

Louisiana: Faubourg Marigny, New Orleans

Louisiana: Faubourg Marigny, New Orleans

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Also known as The Marigny, Faubourg Marigny made a strong comeback in the 1980s and 1990s — what was once a dangerous area of New Orleans has become a neighborhood that draws in artists and young professionals from all over the world. Once you get tired of the French Quarter’s Bourbon Street, the Marigny’s Frenchmen Street has a plethora of amazing restaurants, bars, music venues, independent boutiques, and tattoo studios that present a more local flavor of the city. If you’re planning on following our advice to visit New Orleans this year, spending Mardi Gras in this neighborhood isn’t a bad idea, as it’s known for its creative costumes and abundant reveling.

Maine: Portland

Maine: Portland

Erica M./Yelp

The name Portland, no matter what coast you’re on, definitely evokes a Brooklyn kind of feel, and for good reason. Wonderful for a weekend getaway, Maine’s Portland is also wonderful for foodies and beer lovers, at it’s one of the top American cities for restaurants and bars per capita. Microbreweries and brewpubs abound here, and the Portland Farmers’ Market goes back to 1768.

Maryland: Hampden, Baltimore

Maryland: Hampden, Baltimore

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North Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood is a very artsy area that’s big on celebrating local culture. The annual HonFest celebrates Baltimore stereotypes (like use of the endearment ‘hon’) with contests such as “Miss Hon,” in which contestants wear their best 1960s beehive hairdo, oversized sunglasses, and makeup and clothes, or a contest to see who has the best Baltimore accent. Hampden is also full of specialty stores and independent bars, restaurants, and art galleries. True to its artistic character, it’s also one of the best places in America to see Christmas lights.

Massachusetts: Amherst

Massachusetts: Amherst

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Amherst is everything you’d imagine a New England college town to be. Quaint yet bustling, it is home to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst College, and Hampshire College, all three of which contribute to the town’s serious cultural scene. The young population of the town makes for a busy nightlife and restaurant scene, but the academic vibe also brings about some of the coolest art galleries and museum exhibitions as well as music concerts and all kinds of events that tend to be held on the various campuses. The Amherst Farmers' Market is also one of the best in the country.

Michigan: Corktown, Detroit

Michigan: Corktown, Detroit

Young P./Yelp

Detroit has made a big comeback in the past few years, landing itself a spot on our list of must-visit destinations this year, and people seem to be looking to stay, too. The city as a whole has the second largest year-on-year rent demand increase, with 15.4 percent, and its Corktown neighborhood in particular seems to be very popular with millennials. The oldest neighborhood in the city, Corktown has seen tons of development in the past few years and is home to plenty of breweries, small boutiques, and coffee shops like Astro Coffee, which has been featured in The New York Times, Condé Nast Traveller, and Bon Appetit, among others.

Minnesota: Minneapolis

Minnesota: Minneapolis

The Herbivorous Butcher/Yelp

Minneapolis is a haven for bicyclists and breweries (the city is the No. 5 spot for microbreweries in the country with 6.29 for every 100,000 people). There's even a vegan butcher here. It’s also home to the Tony Award-winning Guthrie Theater and tons of music venues, such as First Avenue, which has seen the early gigs of many famous Twin Cities musicians like Prince and The Replacements. As a result, the music and arts scene is thriving here, and the Northeast Minneapolis  Arts District was voted the nation’s best art district by USA Today. The food scene here is killer too, and Minneapolis took over our list of the best food and drink in the state.

Mississippi: Fondren, Jackson

Mississippi: Fondren, Jackson

Michelle N./Yelp

Fondren is hipster central if you’re in Mississippi. Known as a bastion of creativity, the visual and performing arts find a nurturing home here where there are also over two dozen independent bars, restaurants, bakeries, and coffee shops, such as Sneaky Beans. Jackson’s Indie Music Week also finds its home here with concerts, parties, panels, and more celebrating all kinds of genres as well as independent film.

Missouri: Westport, Kansas City

Missouri: Westport, Kansas City

The KC Improv Company/Yelp

The neighborhood of Westport is one of Kansas City’s oldest, as well as one of it’s coolest. One of the main entertainment districts of the city, it’s a popular place for nightlife as well as food exploration, with many trendy restaurants and bars as well as music venues. Westport is also where you’ll find The KC Improv Company for top comedic talent and Tivoli Cinemas, an independent movie theater dedicated to showing indie films.

Montana: Bozeman

Montana: Bozeman

Co-Op Downtown/Yelp

Almost half of Bozeman is between the ages of 18 and 34, which is why there is so much food, nightlife, and outdoor activity here. The gorgeous Gallatin River offers itself up for some serious watersports, and the many museums and art galleries make up a cultural scene that’s quite prolific. Check out the Sweet Pea Festival, held every summer and featuring food, art, music, theater, and more. There's also a fantastic co-op in downtown Bozeman that sells groceries as well as breakfast, lunch, and dinner with plenty of vegetarian and vegan options.

Nebraska: Benson, Omaha

Nebraska: Benson, Omaha

Benson Brewery/Yelp

Omaha is probably the coolest city in Nebraska, and the neighborhood of Benson is definitely the state’s Brooklyn. Locally-owned coffee houses, sandwich shops, and boutiques abound. Particularly Brooklyn-esque institutions include Benson Brewery, located in what used to be a movie theater in the 1910s, and the Omaha Bicycle Company which serves as both a store and repair shop for bicyclists and a specialty coffee and espresso bar.

Nevada: Downtown Las Vegas

Nevada: Downtown Las Vegas

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Leave behind the famous Las Vegas Strip and hit the city’s downtown for its creative side. A popular shopping complex here, Downtown Container Park, doesn’t allow shops that are too mainstream (read: chain stores) and is literally made out of old shipping containers. If that’s not Brooklyn enough for you, there are plenty of hipster bars and coffee shops here with creative and organic sandwiches, as well as spaces full of art galleries and record collections.

New Hampshire: Portsmouth

New Hampshire: Portsmouth

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America’s third oldest city still manages to draw in a pretty young crowd. Portsmouth has a small town vibe yet offers city-like nightlife and cultural events. The Prescott Park Arts Festival lasts from  June to October, and the city also hosts the New Hampshire Film Festival, a week-long event that is one of the largest of its kind in the region. Unique boutiques and great restaurants also line the streets of Portsmouth, as does the state’s best bar, Portsmouth Brewery.

New Jersey: Hoboken

New Jersey: Hoboken

Black Rail Coffee/Yelp

Over the past decade, Hoboken has rapidly gentrified thanks to students and young professionals looking for proximity to Manhattan yet more affordable rent.  It has an amazing selection of upscale restaurants and trendy eateries, as well as a ton of independent stores, cafes, and yoga studios. Hometown of Ol’ Blue Eyes himself, Hoboken is also the location of the Frank Sinatra Idol Contest and many other cultural events such as the Hoboken International Film Festival, Hoboken Arts and Music Festival , Movies Under the Stars, Hoboken Comedy Festival, and more. Check out the many parks here, perfect for biking or walking your dog, as well as the Hoboken Farmer’s Market.

New Mexico: Albuquerque

New Mexico: Albuquerque

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There are hundreds of organizations, festivals, museums, and associations dedicated to the visual and performance arts in Albuquerque, making New Mexico’s most populous city its most creative. The city has also become quite gentrified recently, and its downtown area just recently underwent a multimillion-dollar revitalization over the past decade that has left it a bastion of craft breweries, art galleries, and independent coffee shops. 

New York: Queens, New York

New York: Queens, New York

The Bonnie/Yelp

We’re not just being cute. Neighborhoods like Astoria, Woodside, and Sunnyside are seeing big increases in population, and with rent continuing to skyrocket in Manhattan and Brooklyn, more and more young professionals are taking to finding a home in Queens. With the influx of newer and younger professionals to this borough comes a boom in startups for them to work at, as well as independently-owned food spots for them to stop at. Queens’ diversity — it’s the most ethnically diverse urban area on the planet and immigrants make up half the population — is finally being properly appreciated as more and more people discover the many different ethnic cuisines one can find here.

North Carolina: Asheville

North Carolina: Asheville

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Asheville is a Southern gem hidden between the Blue Ridge Mountains and Great Smoky Mountains, and has been variously described as the “Paris of the South” and the “San Francisco of the East.” It’s also the best place in North Carolina for live music with plenty of venues and cultural festivals such as the Mountain Dance & Folk Festival (the first ever of its kind to actually be called a folk festival), Downtown After 5, and the Lexington Avenue Arts & Fun Festival. Art galleries and independent bookstores are mainstays here, as are great food stops like the doughnut shop Hole or downtown Asheville’s French Broad Chocolate Lounge.

North Dakota: Fargo

North Dakota: Fargo

Fargo Brewing Company Ale House/Yelp

Despite being a relatively small city with a population of just under 121,000, Fargo has a lot going on, largely thanks to the presence of North Dakota State University as well as two other colleges nearby. The resulting student population gives rise to a bustling arts and culture scene with many theater productions and cultural events, as well as music groups and entertainment scenes. Fargo is also home to North Dakota’s best restaurant scene. Try the tortelloni vodka at Toscana, the best pasta dish you’ll find in the state, or have a treat at Angel’s Cups, one of America’s top cupcakes. Fargo Brewing Company is known not only for its fantastic brews, but also for hosting $15 yoga classes where you can drink for free!

Ohio: Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati

Ohio: Over-the-Rhine, Cincinnati

Cindy G./Yelp

The location of the 2001 Cincinnati riots, Over-the-Rhine was considered one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in the country until not too long ago. Gentrification began just a few years later, however, resulting in much controversy as well as change. Since then, it has become a hidden food and drink gem with many independent and artisan shops selling all kinds of baked goods, coffee, sandwiches, and more. You can find the best of Cincinnati’s breweries here, as well as some of its greatest cultural events, like the Cincinnati Fringe Festival, Bockfest (celebrating German-style bock beer), and the MidPoint Music Festival.

Oklahoma: Stillwater

Oklahoma: Stillwater

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Thanks to the presence of Oklahoma State University, over half the population of Stillwater is between the ages of 18 and 34. Naturally, the city has a ton of festivals and events celebrating the performing arts, cars, food, and more. Stillwater’s musical heritage is particularly impressive, as it’s the home of the red dirt genre, a mix of rock, folk, blues, and country, and so named due to the color of Oklahoman soil. Check out Eskimo Joe’s, a locally famous restaurant containing four bars and tons of college students, where artists like The All-American Rejects and Garth Brooks got their start and where both Presidents Bush have publicly praised the cheese fries.

Oregon: Portland

Oregon: Portland

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Portland is basically the West Coast’s Brooklyn. It’s the top city in terms of vegan store density (16.7 stores per 100,000 people) and No. 3 in the country in terms of microbreweries (of which there are 8.1 for every 100,000 people). It’s a big city with a small town feel, perfect for a weekend getaway, and it has a ton of parks and gardens offering many opportunities to enjoy your bike or a walk with your dog. Known for its arts scene and its coffee too, Portland is also home to more independent publishers than any other city in America.

Pennsylvania: Fishtown, Philadelphia

Pennsylvania: Fishtown, Philadelphia

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Hipsters flock to a good food scene, and in Fishtown, you’ll find exactly that. Home to the world’s first pizza museum, Fishtown has some great independent restaurants with all kinds of cuisine, and it’s also the new location of Philadelphia Distilling, the craft brewery that led Daily Meal contributor Reuben Mourad to declare that drinking itineraries were one of this year’s travel trends to watch out for. You’ll also find some amazing music venues here featuring Philadelphia’s best local bands and art galleries galore.

Rhode Island: Fox Point, Providence

Rhode Island: Fox Point, Providence

Dave L./Yelp

The population of Fox Point is largely young and educated, and this Providence neighborhood is filled with independent restaurants and cafes as well as yoga studios. Not far from Brown University, the area has rapidly gentrified and you’ll find plenty of stores selling organic, vegan, local, and fair trade products.

South Carolina: Greenville

South Carolina: Greenville

Samantha C./Yelp

Although probably not as cool as Charleston, Greenville, South Carolina, is heaven for Southern hipsters with cultural events like Euphoria Greenville (a three-day culinary festival), Artisphere (a three-day art festival), and Fall for Greenville (a three-day street festival for both food and music). Other cultural events here include SC Comicon, the Upstate Shakespeare Festival, New South Comedy Festival, and the Indie Craft Parade, and Greenville is also home to plenty of independent boutiques and coffee shops, such as Methodical Coffee. If that’s not Brooklyn enough for you, Greenville was also featured in a book about the best art towns in the country, and has multiple theater groups and music venues throughout town as well as a thriving social dance scene where you can practice contra dancing, the Lindy Hop, or the Carolina Shag.

South Dakota: Sioux Falls

South Dakota: Sioux Falls

MB Haskett Delicatessen/Yelp

The great outdoors of the Midwest can be experienced in full at Sioux Falls, and a visit to Falls Park will provide plenty of places from which to witness the natural beauty of South Dakota. A recent increase in immigration has led to diverse ethnic cuisine, and the area’s shopping  and food opportunities include the Empire Mall — the largest shopping complex between Minneapolis and Denver — and spots like M.B. Haskett Delicatessen.

Tennessee: Knoxville

Tennessee: Knoxville

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Old factories and warehouses have been converted into apartment complexes in Knoxville, ushering in a generation of young people who are bringing Knoxville back to life. Once the setting of the 1982 World’s Fair, Knoxville is home to the University of Tennessee and is only about 30 minutes from the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A variety of restaurants and fascinating shops and boutiques line the downtown Market Square — home to one of the country’s best farmers markets — and visitors can head to the Old City for a varied nightlife with something for everyone.

Texas: Austin

Texas: Austin

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Locals may love to “Keep Austin Weird,” but this city is a good kind of odd, and definitely the kind of odd that attracts the hipster crowd like flies on honey. Austin has a unique ambience in comparison with the rest of the state and is the live music capital of the world, with tons of music venues and festivals to check out. Like everything else in Texas, Austin is huge, so it’s divided into six districts. Tech is booming here, and the city is also known as “Silicon Hills” due to its reputation for fostering tech start-ups. Austin offers tons of shopping, art galleries, and multiple museums and parks, and outdoor endeavors are popular, particularly rock climbing and mountain biking. You can also go for a swim in a spring-fed pool or rent a kayak, canoe, paddle board, or tube. Make sure you try the Tex-Mex while you’re there too! Austin’s food scene is a great mix of Southwestern and cosmopolitan.

Utah: Sugar House, Salt Lake City

Utah: Sugar House, Salt Lake City

JP S./Yelp

Salt Lake City is already pretty hip, with 13.9 vegan stores per every 100,000 people, making it the second best city for vegans. Its Sugar House neighborhood, in particular, has a reputation for trendy spots such as indie stores, thrift shops, art galleries, breweries, and coffee shops like Sugar House Coffee.

Vermont: Burlington

Vermont: Burlington

Mae B./Yelp

Located along Lake Champlain, Burlington is an unassuming hub of Vermont with a laid-back culture and impressive food scene. Go downtown to witness some interesting shops and eateries or check out one of the many cultural institutions, such as Flynn Center for the Performing Arts or The Bern Gallery, a grassroots smokeshop and art gallery featuring glassblowing and local art and jewelry. There are many festivals hosted in Burlington every year, including (but not limited to) the Vermont Brewers Festival in July, the Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival, and First Night, a New Year’s Eve celebration that features fireworks, performances, and parades.

Virginia: Shirlington

Virginia: Shirlington

Katrina P./Yelp

Shirlington is an urban village, or an unincorporated urban area, of Arlington, which is already the coolest city in Virginia. Considered to be the arts and entertainment district of Arlington, Shirlington is home to both Arlington’s Theatre on the Run and Signature Theatre, a Tony Award-winning regional theater company, as well as multiple cultural and music festivals. The Arlington location of Busboys & Poets — a well-known restaurant, lounge, and bookstore in the D.C. area — is also located in Shirlington, bringing in socially and politically progressive writers and performers from all over the country.

Washington: Vancouver

Washington: Vancouver

Jen C./Yelp

Vancouver is more Brooklyn than Brooklyn. This is the second best place for microbreweries (8.6 per 100,000 people, right behind Denver’s 8.8) and the fifth best for tattoo shops (5.2 per 100,000 people). What really seals the deal that Vancouver is the most hipster city in Washington, if not the country, however, is rent demand. Currently, it leads the nation with a 16.2 percent year on year increase in rent demand.

Washington, D.C.: U Street Corridor

Washington, D.C.: U Street Corridor

Jeff H./Yelp

Washington D.C.’s U Street is the center of the capital’s artistic scene, with multiple theaters and music venues cultivating its strong musical tradition. This is also the home of the Funk Parade, an annual celebration of funk music, and plenty of D.C.’s best restaurants, such as Ben’s Chili Bowl which serves the best hot dog in the city. U Street is also particularly well known for its public art, particularly the murals and graffiti art that is ubiquitous here.

West Virginia: Fayetteville

West Virginia: Fayetteville

Jonathan G./Yelp

Known as the “Gateway to the New River Gorge,” Fayetteville is a small town with fantastic scenery and great opportunities for outdoor activities you may not have otherwise thought of doing. While you can do some horseback riding, you may be more intrigued by the llama treks that are popular here. The waters, rivers, mountains, and landscapes of Fayetteville draw many visitors for scenic hiking, drives, and different river expeditions, most notably rafting. Make sure to check out the Appalachian arts and crafts available in local shops, as well as the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market.

Wisconsin: Historic Third Ward, Milwaukee

Wisconsin: Historic Third Ward, Milwaukee

Broadway Theatre Center/Yelp

Milwaukee’s Third Ward is a historic district that’s actually on the National Register of Historic Places. More than 500 businesses operate here, including many specialty stores, art galleries, and trendy restaurants. Over 20 art galleries and studios are located in the Third Ward, as well as the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design, and the Broadway Theatre Centre, to name just a few of the places where this hub of the arts shines. The largest music festival in the world, Summerfest, is held here in Henry Maier Festival Park as well.

Wyoming: Jackson

Wyoming: Jackson

Lotus Organic Restaurant & Bakery/Yelp

Many people confuse Jackson with Jackson Hole, the latter being a region which happens to be one of the best weekend getaways in America. The city of Jackson is a part of Jackson Hole, but very much its own entity. A small town with only approximately 6,000 year-round residents, Jackson is a beautiful place to be in either the winter or summer, depending on your preferences. Hit up the town square for some interesting and quaint shops, galleries, or eateries, such as Lotus Organic Restaurant & Bakery, or to watch street performers act out a skit in the summers. The winter months turn this town into a hopping ski resort, and the healing arts are big here year-round, with some high-quality day spas. If that kind of vacation is what you’re after, check out our list of the 101 best all-inclusive resorts in the world.