Gyoza: Japanese-Style Potstickers

Staff Writer
Gyoza: Japanese-Style Potstickers

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Gyoza, or potsticker, is the Japanese version of the Chinese dumpling. Unlike wontons, the gyoza dumpling wrappers are slightly thicker and have a chewier texture which goes great with the filling, often a mix of ground pork and vegetables. If pork is not your thing, you can also use ground beef, turkey or even shrimp. Although the recipe takes some time, chances are you’ll have plenty of leftover dumplings to keep and re-heat on those lazy-dinner nights. Simply place leftovers in airtight containers or Ziploc bags and store in freezer (though they’re best eaten within the week).  This is a fun recipe to make with roommates or friends, but if you’re making it alone, it’s also a great way to make dinner and catch up on all your Netflix queues. These ingredients can be found at M2M or another Asian or specialty grocery store.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 10-20 minutes
Total Time: 40-50 minutes

Servings: 2-4

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Ingredients:
1-2 cups minced cabbage
1-2 stalks of green onion
1/2 lb ground pork
1 pack dumpling wrappers (find them at M2M or an Asian grocery store)
1-2 cloves of garlic
1/2 tablespoon grated ginger
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
Small bowl of water
1-2 teaspoons cornstarch
Salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Toss the minced cabbage with salt and let it sit for a few minutes.

2. Mince the green onion and mix it with the ground pork in a large bowl.

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

3. Make a garlic paste by mincing the garlic, sprinkling a little salt and then smooshing it with the flat of your blade. Add the garlic paste, grated ginger, salt, pepper, soy sauce, sesame oil, rice vinegar and the cabbage (make sure you squeeze out any leftover water) to the bowl and mix until everything is combined. Set aside.

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

4. Make a cornstarch slurry by combining the water and cornstarch. If you don’t have cornstarch, just water works too.

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

5. Lay one dumpling wrapper on a dry, clean surface and place a spoonful of filling in the center. Dip your finger in the slurry (or water) and run it along the edges of the dumpling wrapper. Fold the wrapper over and press along the edges to seal them shut. Pleat the top of the dumpling and set aside on a plate or sheet pan. Repeat with the remaining wrappers.

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

6. Lightly coat the bottom of a large frying pan (skillet/sauté pan/etc.) with sesame oil and heat over medium high heat. Carefully place a few dumplings in the pan as you can with the pleated side up. Cook until the bottoms are a golden brown, about 3 minutes.

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

7. Once the bottoms are browned, carefully add in 1/4 cup of water. The water will bubble and jump out, so be careful! Cover the pan with a tightly fitted lid, lower the temperature so that the water is at a simmer and steam until the tops of the dumplings are translucent, about 2 minutes.

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

Photo by Patrick Domingo

8. Remove the lid once the skins are translucent and let the dumplings continue to cook until there is only oil left in the pan. Once you hear a sizzling sound and all the water is gone, give the pan a little shake. The dumplings should slide freely.  If they seem to stick to the pan, move the pan away from the stove and replace the lid for a moment.  Remove the dumplings from the pan with a broad flexible spatula.

6. Cook some rice to go along with the gyoza and serve with soy sauce, rice vinegar and some chili oil.

 

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