Greek Theater Accepts Food as Payment

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Part of the 'food revolution,' Thessaloniki theater aims to help the hungry
A woman gives food in exchange for a theater ticket at the State Theater of Northern Greece.
Nikolas Giakoumidis / AP

A woman gives food in exchange for a theater ticket at the State Theater of Northern Greece.

Much like Greece's "potato revolution," citizens are finding new ways to help those affected by the food crisis. The newest solution? Theater.

The Associated Press reports that the State Theater of Northern Greece will begin a series of live performances where the only payment they'll accept is food. Starting tonight through May, spectators can bring canned food to see the Social Theatre shows instead of the $7 to $27 it normally costs to see a show.

The art director, Sotiris Hadzakis, told the AP, "We are creating a solidarity network, during the crisis, that works in terms of direct democracy... We intend to continue next year too, as, unfortunately, it looks as if the crisis is set to endure."

The deputy artistic director, Giannis Rigas, told the Guardian admittedly that theatregoers have no money; this is one way to continue bringing in an audience. However, the move is also for solidtary. He said, "The theater is a place to be together. It's a physical thing — the performers, the technicians, the audience, all become one. And we need to be brought together again. In recent times, we lost that."