12 Human Foods You Should Never Feed Your Dog

Keep your furry friend safe by making sure these harmful foods are out of reach
Chocolate

12 Human Foods You Should Never Feed Your Dog

12 Human Foods You Should Never Feed Your Dog

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Some dogs are incessantly food-driven and will devour just about anything that you offer them usually with no consequences… But no matter how much we treat our dogs like people, there are some human foods that should be strictly off-limits for dogs.

Some human foods are toxic to dogs and can potentially lead to an array of scary (and expensive) medical issues and vet procedures. When in doubt — and even when those puppy-dog eyes are melting your heart and resolve — it’s safer to disappoint your pup rather send him or her to the emergency room. Read on to find out for sure which foods you should never, ever let your dog near.

 

Alcohol

Alcohol

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You think your hangovers are bad? Now, would you wish that on your puppy? Dogs exhibit the same type of behavior as humans when intoxicated such as decreased coordination, vomiting, a depressed central nervous system, and, in extreme situations, alcohol consumption can result in coma, seizure, and even death.

Apple Cores

apple core

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Apples are actually effective teeth cleaners and breath fresheners for dogs, but beware of the core. The core is a potential choking hazard and it also contains a toxin call cyanogenic glycoside, aka cyanide, that can be very harmful to your dog. 

Caffeinated Beverages

Caffeinated Beverages

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Whether you are on team Coke or team Pepsi, make sure your dog sits this one out. The sugar can give them a case of puppy diabetes (yes, that’s actually a thing), but the primary issue is the caffeine. Possible side effects of caffeine consumption include hyperthermia, abnormal heart rhythms, and elevated heart rates.

Bones

Bones

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Throwing a dog a bone may seem like the most natural thing to do, but both raw and cooked bones can be dangerous. Bones can splinter, sending sharp fragments through your dog’s system that cause blockages and punctures. Broken teeth and choking are also common factors associated with bones. 

Chocolate

Chocolate

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The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous it is for your dog. Methylxanthines, some of the compounds in chocolate, can make dogs exhibit symptoms such as vomiting, increased thirst, abdominal discomfort, restlessness, severe agitation, muscle tremors, irregular heart rhythm, high body temperature, seizures, and even death. 

Corn on the Cob

Corn on the Cob

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In this case, the cob is more of the culprit when it comes to being dangerous for your puppy. Many dogs accidentally ingest too much of the cob, and end up suffering from severe intestinal obstruction. 

Dairy Products

Dairy Products

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Few people know that most dogs are actually lactose intolerant. Dogs have a hard time breaking down the enzymes in dairy products, and dogs that ingest dairy are often afflicted with violent vomiting and fits of diarrhea. 

Grapes and Raisins

Grapes and Raisins

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These sweet human treats are directly linked to kidney failure in dogs, sometimes as soon as 72 hours after ingestion. Though it isn’t fully determined what causes the failure, dogs who do consume raisins or grapes experience vomiting, lethargy, or diarrhea within 12 hours of consumption. If ignored, it's possible the dog could die from complications within three to four days.

Onions

Onions

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Experts say onions, and all of the tasty foods in their family (garlic, shallots, etc.), are right up there with chocolate, grapes, and raisins in terms of toxicity. Onions can damage dogs’ red blood cells if ingested in large quantities and may even require costly blood transfusions. Dogs may seem weak, reluctant to move, appear to tire easily, and their urine may be dark red in color.

Nuts

Nuts

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While all nuts can be harmful to pups, the macadamia nut may be the worst of all. Affected dogs may experience something equivalent to a 48-hour bug in humans. The poor dogs will develop weakness in their rear legs, appear to be in pain, have tremors, and may even develop a low-grade fever.

Nutmeg

Nutmeg

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Dogs that ingest nutmeg can experience severe damage to the nervous system resulting in hallucinogenic episodes as well as seizures, tremors, and even death.