Turkish Spinach

Turkish Spinach
Staff Writer
Turkish Spinach
Joy E. Stocke and Angie Brenner

Turkish Spinach

Here's a quick and easy side dish that's packed with nutrients. A simple topping of Greek yogurt, garlic, olive oil, and red pepper flakes sets this side dish apart from other versions of sautéed spinach.

See all spinach recipes.

4
Servings
78
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 large red onion, chopped finely
  • One 14 ½-ounce can crushed or diced tomatoes
  • 2 bunches spinach, chopped
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, grated or minced
  • 1 Cup Greek yogurt
  • 1-2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 Teaspoon red pepper flakes or cayenne

Directions

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat and add the onion. Cook until softened but not brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes just to heat. (Add 1-2 tablespoons water if it is too dry.) Stir in the chopped spinach, and cover with a lid. Cook until wilted, about 1-2 minutes, then remove the lid and cook until all excess water evaporates.

Beat the garlic into the yogurt. If time allows, place in the refrigerator for about 15 minutes to allow the flavors to meld. Place a dollop of the yogurt mixture on top of the spinach. Just before serving, top the yogurt with the olive oil and season with the red pepper flakes or cayenne.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
4g
6%
Sugar
6g
7%
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Cholesterol
2mg
1%
Carbohydrate, by difference
7g
5%
Protein
4g
9%
Vitamin A, RAE
26µg
4%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
1mg
1%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
1µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
50mg
5%
Choline, total
8mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
1g
4%
Folate, total
11µg
3%
Magnesium, Mg
7mg
2%
Phosphorus, P
60mg
9%
Selenium, Se
5µg
9%
Sodium, Na
17mg
1%
Vitamin D (D2 + D3)
1µg
7%
Water
40g
1%

Spinach Shopping Tip

Buy green leafy vegetables like arugula, watercress, and collards – they are good sources of vitamins A, C, and K and minerals like iron and calcium.

Spinach Cooking Tip

Brighten up sandwiches or salads with small, tender leaves like spinach and add larger, tougher leaves like kale to soups and stews.