Tilapia with Tomato, Bell Pepper, and Snap Peas

Staff Writer
Tilapia with Tomato, Bell Pepper, and Snap Peas
Tilapia with Tomato, Bell Pepper, and Snap Peas
Will Budiaman

Tilapia with Tomato, Bell Pepper, and Snap Peas

I created a colorful medley of seasonal vegetables that's as much a feast for the eyes as it is for the palate. The key to this simple dish is not to overcook the tilapia and to keep the vegetables crisp-tender. You can feel free to substitute whatever vegetables you prefer.

Click here to see Tasty Tilapia Recipes for Any Night of the Week.

Ready in
30 m
2
Servings
857
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 3 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Two 1/2-pound tilapia fillets
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 shallots, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 Pound snap peas, trimmed
  • 1/4 Cup sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 1 orange bell pepper, seeded and julienned
  • 1 beefsteak tomato, chopped
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 10 basil leaves

Directions

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a 10-inch skillet over high heat. Season the fillets generously on both sides with salt and pepper. Cook one at a time until golden, about 1 ½ minutes per side. Remove from the heat and set aside. To the same pan, add the remaining olive oil and reduce the heat to medium.

Add the shallots and cook until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add the snap peas and cook for 1 minute. Season generously with salt and pepper. Add the remaining vegetables in order, one by one, cooking each for 1 minute and seasoning generously with salt and pepper before adding the next.

Remove from the heat and coat the vegetables with the lemon juice. Top with the basil leaves, and allow them to wilt slightly before serving with the fish.

Tilapia Shopping Tip

A fresh fish should not smell fishy nor have milky, opaque eyes; it should have bright red gills, firm flesh, and a tight anal cavity.

Tilapia Cooking Tip

Whole fish should be stored upright in ice in the refrigerator.

Tilapia Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
31g
47%
Sugar
14g
N/A
Saturated Fat
6g
31%
Cholesterol
283mg
94%
Protein
120g
100%
Carbs
28g
9%
Vitamin A
188µg
21%
Vitamin B12
9µg
100%
Vitamin B6
2mg
78%
Vitamin C
165mg
100%
Vitamin D
18µg
4%
Vitamin E
7mg
35%
Vitamin K
72µg
89%
Calcium
161mg
16%
Fiber
8g
32%
Folate (food)
246µg
N/A
Folate equivalent (total)
246µg
62%
Iron
7mg
40%
Magnesium
215mg
54%
Monounsaturated
18g
N/A
Niacin (B3)
24mg
100%
Phosphorus
1108mg
100%
Polyunsaturated
4g
N/A
Potassium
2512mg
72%
Riboflavin (B2)
0.6mg
33.9%
Sodium
2115mg
88%
Thiamin (B1)
0.5mg
34.1%
Zinc
3mg
19%