Tacos de Chivo

Tacos de Chivo
Staff Writer
Food Network

The Food Network star, Aaròn Sànchez has an innovative take on the traditional taco, using goat meat braised with his signature Chile Colorado Sauce, resulting in a taco that is sweet, tangy and packed with Latin flavor.  This is just one meal that this sauce can be used to spice up - Chef Sànchez's sauces can be applied to a number of different recipes.

16
Servings
414
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the tacos de chivo

  • 4 Pounds bone-in cut of goat, such as shoulder or leg
  • 2 Cups Chile Colorado sauce

For the Chile Colorado sauce

  • 3 medium Spanish onions, quartered
  • 8 medium tomatillos, husked and washed
  • 4 plum tomatoes, cored and quartered
  • 8 whole garlic cloves, peeled
  • olive oil, for drizzling
  • 1/2 Ounce ancho Chile , stemmed, seeded, and deveined
  • 1/2 Ounce gaujillo chiles, stemmed, seeded, and deveined
  • 4 Cups chicken stock
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the roasted tomatillo salsa

  • 1 1/2 Pound fresh tomatillos
  • 5 fresh serrano of 10 jalapeño chiles, stemmed
  • 3 whole garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1 large white onion, peeled and sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • 1/4 Cup olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 Cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • freshly ground black pepper

Directions

For the tacos de chivo

1. Put the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 

Put the meat in a shallow 3-quart baking dish.

Generously season the meat with salt. Pour the Chile Colorado Sauce over the meat and rub it on all sides of the meat. Cover the dish tightly with two layers of foil and cook in the oven until the meat is very tender, 3 to 3½ hours.

Take the dish from the oven (keep the oven on), remove and reserve the foil, and let the meat cool in its liquid for about 30 minutes.

When it’s cool enough to handle, coarsely shred the meat with your fingers or forks, discarding the bones. Return the meat to the cooking liquid, stir, cover the dish again with the foil, and return it in the oven until the sauce is hot, about 30 minutes.

After about 15 minutes, make two stacks of tortillas, wrap the stacks in foil, and put them in the oven to heat.

Serve the meat in the baking dish with the tortillas and other accompaniments in bowls alongside, and let everyone assemble their own tacos at the table.

For the Chile Colorado sauce

Preheat the broiler. Put the onion, tomatillos, tomatoes and garlic on a baking pan and drizzle them with olive oil. Put the baking sheet under the broiler and cook without turning until the vegetables start to get charred, about 7 minutes. Remove, set aside, and let cool to room temperature.

In a large dry skillet over medium-low heat, toast the guajillos, turning them over halfway through, just until they smell great, about 1 minute. Transfer them to a bowl, cover them with hot water and let them soak until they’re soft, about 30 minutes.

Drain the chiles and discard the soaking water. Combine the vegetables and chiles in a blender with the chicken stock (you’ll have to work in batches) and puree until the mixture is very smooth.

Transfer each batch to a bowl as it’s done, and stir the batches together well. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week or in the freezer for up to a month.

For the roasted tomatillo salsa

Preheat the broiler. Remove the husks from the tomatillos. Rinse the tomatillos under warm water to remove the stickiness. Dry them with a paper towel.

Put the tomatillos, chiles, garlic, and onion on a baking sheet. Drizzle them with the olive oil and sprinkle on 2 teaspoons or so of kosher salt. Broil them a few inches from the heat, turning everything once, until the tomatillos are softened and slightly charred, about 7 minutes. 

Let the vegetables cool to room temperature.

Transfer them to a blender with the cilantro and puree until smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week or freeze for up to 2 months.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
23g
33%
Sugar
6g
7%
Saturated Fat
9g
38%
Cholesterol
82mg
27%
Carbohydrate, by difference
22g
17%
Protein
28g
61%
Vitamin A, RAE
147µg
21%
Vitamin B-12
1µg
42%
Vitamin B-6
1mg
77%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
15mg
20%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
179µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
102mg
10%
Choline, total
5mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
41µg
10%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
56mg
18%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
6mg
43%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
273mg
39%
Selenium, Se
34µg
62%
Sodium, Na
1168mg
78%
Thiamin
1mg
91%
Water
162g
6%
Zinc, Zn
3mg
38%

Taco Shopping Tip

How hot is that chile pepper? Fresh peppers get hotter as they age; they will achieve a more reddish hue and sometimes develop streaks in the skin.

Taco Cooking Tip

There are 60 varieties of chile peppers, many of which are used in Mexican cooking. Handle them with care. When handling the spicier kinds, gloves are recommended. Always wash your hands with soap and warm water before touching your eyes.

Taco Wine Pairing

Malbec, syrah/shiraz, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, primitivo, or carménère with meat- and bean-based dishes; viognier or grüner veltliner with seafood dishes.