Vietnamese Pork Banh Mi Burger

Add a Vietnamese twist to your burger: Top it with pickled vegetables, sriracha mayonnaise, and serve it on a baguette
Banh Mi Burger

Photo Modified: Flickr / Stacy Spensley / CC BY 4.0

Transform a classic Vietnamese banh mi sandwich into a burger by swapping the roasted meat for a spicy, umami-packed burger.

This recipe is courtesy of Nomageddon.

Deliver Ingredients


For the sriracha mayonnaise

  • 1 1/3 Cup Kewpie mayonnaise
  • 4 scallions, minced
  • 2 Tablespoons sriracha

For the pickled vegetables

  • 1/3 Cup rice vinegar
  • 1/3 Cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 Teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 Cups daikon, julienned
  • 2 Cups carrots, julienned

For the burgers

  • 1 Pound ground pork
  • 1/4 Cup fresh basil, finely chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 3 scallions, minced
  • 1 Tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 Tablespoon sriracha
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 2 Teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 Teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 Teaspoon kosher salt
  • Sesame oil
  • 1 baguette
  • Cilantro leaves
  • 1 jalapeño, sliced (optional)


For the sriracha mayonnaise

In a medium bowl mix together all the ingredients until well combined.

For the pickled vegetables

In a large bowl, whisk together vinegar, sugar, and salt. Add the carrots and daikon and soak for at least one hour.

For the burgers

Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium-high heat.

Slice baguette into 4 equal parts, and slice each part in half lengthways. Spread sriracha mayonnaise on the cut side of the bottom half and set aside.

Place ground pork, basil, garlic, scallions, fish sauce, sriracha, sugar, cornstarch, pepper, and salt in a large bowl. Mix together with your hands until well combined. Form into 4 patties, about 2 ½ inches in diameter. Make an indent in the center with your thumb.

Pour a thin layer of sesame oil into your hot skillet. Add your burger patties, making sure you don’t overfill the pan. Sear until cooked through, about 4 minutes on each side.

Serve burger on the baguette, topped with pickled vegetables, cilantro, and, if desired, sliced jalapeño peppers.

Vietnamese Shopping Tip

To find the ingredients you need to cook Southeast Asian cuisine, try to find specialty grocery stores in the Asian neighborhoods in your town.

Vietnamese Cooking Tip

Southeast Asian Cuisine is about the balance of flavors between sweet and sour; hot and mild. When working with Asian chilis, the smaller ones are usually spicier. Handle with caution and care.