Tuna T-Bone

Tuna T-Bone
Staff Writer
Thinkstock/iStockphoto

Tuna is always thought of a steak, but cutting it this way makes it look a like T-bone steak. First I sear the T-bone so it has a crisp texture and then finish it in the oven to ensure that it's cooked thoroughly without burning. 

 

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4
Servings
512
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

* Butcher cracked pepper is very coursely cracked pepper

 

 

 

 

* to get a T-bone cut from the fish, you cut the head first, then cut the fish into 2 big pieces. From there, you split the pieces horizontally, so the spine of the fish has imprinted a  "T" into the fillet. 

Ingredients

For the sauce

  • 3 shallots, sliced
  • 12 shrimp shells
  • 2 Cups red wine
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • 1/2 Cup tomato concasse
  • 1 Cup veal demi glace
  • 3 Tablespoons butter, to finish
  • 1 Tablespoon sweet butter
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

For the tomato marmalade

  • 1 Tablespoon canola oil
  • 1/2 Cup finely diced onion
  • 2 Cups tomato concasse
  • 2 Tablespoons sugar
  • Juice and zest from 1 orange

For the tuna steaks

  • 4 tuna T-bone steaks*
  • Butcher cracked black pepper, to taste*
  • Salt, to taste
  • 4 Tablespoons olive oil

Directions

For the sauce

In a non-corrosive sauce pot, melt the sweet butter and cook the shallot until transluscent. Add the shrimp shells and cook until they turn pink in color. Add the thyme, tomatoes, and red wine and reduce to 1 cup. Add the demi glaze and reduce by a 1/3. Pass the sauce through a strainger and finish with the 3 tablespoons of butter. Season with salt and pepper to taste. 

 

For the tomato marmalade

In a non-corrosive sauce pan heat the canola oil and cook the onion until transluscent, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and their juice and reduce until dry. Add the sugar and the orange juice and zest and reduce until try. Season with salt and pepper to taste and cool. Can be made up to 2 days in advance. 

For the tuna steaks

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Heat the olive oil in a large oven-proof pan (large enough to fit all 4 steaks, or 2 separate pans) to high until it reaches its smoking point. Season the steaks with salt and the pepper to taste and add to the hot pan. Cook on medium high flame until brown on 1 side. Flip the fish and put it in the oven for 6 minutes, or until done. Fish is done when it is firm to the touch. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
35g
50%
Sugar
2g
2%
Saturated Fat
25g
100%
Cholesterol
22mg
7%
Carbohydrate, by difference
23g
18%
Protein
11g
24%
Vitamin A, RAE
51µg
7%
Vitamin B-12
1µg
42%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
27mg
36%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
6µg
7%
Calcium, Ca
60mg
6%
Choline, total
31mg
7%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Fluoride, F
105µg
4%
Folate, total
32µg
8%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
49mg
15%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
5mg
36%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
162mg
23%
Selenium, Se
7µg
13%
Sodium, Na
132mg
9%
Water
255g
9%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Tuna Shopping Tip

Seafood shopping is quite easy in the general sense. Rule of thumb: if it smells fishy, don't buy. Fresh seafood should smell mild and more like the ocean and sea water rather than fish.

Tuna Cooking Tip

Looking for a quick mid-week dinner? Seafood is a safe bet. It's quick to cook and simple recipes can get dinner on the table in 20 minutes.

Tuna Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.