Tilapia with Spicy Kumquat Salsa

Staff Writer
Tilapia with Spicy Kumquat Salsa
Kumquat Salsa
Yasmin Fahr

Kumquat Salsa

Kumquats, the babies of the citrus family, have a sweet, edible rind and a slightly tart pulp (everything is edible except for the seeds). I typically muddle them in mojitos or caipirinhas, but incorporating them in this spicy salsa as a substitute for tomatoes adds a soft, sweet touch to this topping for quickly cooked fish.  

You could also try adding cubes of ripe avocado to the salsa as well — I see no reason why that wouldn't be a fabulous addition. Alternatively, you can use other flaky white fish instead of tilapia if it's not available. 

Click here to see more Sweet and Tangy Citrus recipes.

Ready in
25 m
2
Servings
280
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the kumquat salsa

  • 4-5 kumquats, seeds removed and diced
  • 1/2 jalapeño, diced (about 1 tablesoon)
  • 1 small shallot, diced (about 1 tablespoon)
  • Juice of 1/2 lime, plus more to taste
  • Salt, to taste
  • 2 sprigs of cilantro, leaves picked and roughly torn

For the tilapia

  • 2 tilapia fillets
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/2 teaspoon hot paprika

Directions

For the kumquat salsa

In a bowl, combine all of the ingredients, seasoning to taste as needed. Allow the flavors to meld together while you cook the fish. 

For the tilapia

Wash and pat dry the fillets and set aside. In a large bowl, combine the remaining ingredients together and mix well. Add the fish and coat it thoroughly with the mixture.

Heat a large cast-iron or heavy pan over high heat. Add the fish and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side. Serve immediately and spoon the salsa on top. 

Tilapia Shopping Tip

A fresh fish should not smell fishy nor have milky, opaque eyes; it should have bright red gills, firm flesh, and a tight anal cavity.

Tilapia Cooking Tip

Whole fish should be stored upright in ice in the refrigerator.

Tilapia Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
16g
25%
Sugar
5g
N/A
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Cholesterol
58mg
19%
Protein
25g
50%
Carbs
11g
4%
Vitamin A
50µg
6%
Vitamin B12
2µg
31%
Vitamin B6
0.3mg
14%
Vitamin C
29mg
49%
Vitamin D
4µg
1%
Vitamin E
3mg
16%
Vitamin K
20µg
25%
Calcium
62mg
6%
Fiber
4g
17%
Folate (food)
41µg
N/A
Folate equivalent (total)
41µg
10%
Iron
2mg
12%
Magnesium
50mg
12%
Monounsaturated
11g
N/A
Niacin (B3)
5mg
25%
Phosphorus
223mg
32%
Polyunsaturated
2g
N/A
Potassium
536mg
15%
Riboflavin (B2)
0.1mg
8.3%
Sodium
469mg
20%
Zinc
0.6mg
4.1%