Thanksgiving Potpies

Try this recipe for Thanksgiving Potpies from the 'Magpie' cookbook
Contributor
Thanksgiving Potpies

Steve Legato

Why do we eat Thanksgiving dinner only once a year? It’s one of my favorite holiday meals, so I turned the feast into cozy potpies. Keep some shells, filling, and stuffing in the freezer and you can whip these up in no time, anytime.

Reprinted with permission from Magpie © 2015 by Holly Ricciardi, Running Press, a member of the Perseus Books Group.

Ingredients

  • 1 recipe Magpie Dough for Flaky Piecrust (see notes), chilled overnight
  • 2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 4 celery stalks, chopped
  • 2 medium carrots, sliced quarter-inch thick
  • 6 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 Cups low-sodium turkey or chicken stock
  • 1 Teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 1 Teaspoon poultry seasoning
  • 2 Teaspoons turkey base
  • 1 Pound boneless, skinless turkey breast, cut into half-inch pieces
  • 1 Cup frozen petite peas
  • 1 Cup frozen corn
  • 1 Teaspoon minced fresh parsley leaves
  • 1/2 Teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 14 Ounces canned cranberry sauce, for topping

Directions

Roll, pan, and bake the pot­pie shells. To bake the shells pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees F. While the oven is heating freeze the raw pie shells for 15 to 20 minutes. Then, line the shells with parchment paper and fill with pie weights. Slide the pie tins into the oven and bake for about 20 minutes. Then, remove the weighs and bake the shells for 5 more minutes.

Set the baking sheet on a wire rack and let the shells cool to room temperature while you make the filling. Melt the butter in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat and sauté the onions, celery, and car­rots until tender, 5 to 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, make the slurry. Put the flour in a bowl and whisk in the stock until the flour dissolves.

When the vegetables are tender, add the garlic granules and poul­try seasoning to the pan and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Turn the heat under the pan up to medium-high and whisk in the slurry. Cook, whisking constantly, until the mixture starts to thicken to a gravy consistency. Then bring the mixture to a boil and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often to prevent the mix­ture from sticking to the bottom of the pan and scorching.

Stir in the bouillon and the turkey pieces. Lower the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the turkey is cooked through, stir­ring often. Add the peas and corn and simmer for another 5 minutes. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the parsley and lemon juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (At this point the filling can be cooled, transferred to airtight containers, and refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 1 month. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight; gently rewarm in the micro­wave or in a saucepan on the stovetop.)

To assemble the potpies, preheat the broiler to low. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Carefully unmold the potpie shells and set them on the lined baking sheet. Divide the filling among the shells and top with warm apple fennel stuffing. Slide the baking sheet under the broiler for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the stuffing begins to toast up.

Serve with cranberry sauce, heaped either on top or on the side.

Thanksgiving Shopping Tip

Make sure you have all the recipes you are going to make ahead of time. Compile your grocery list from those recipes a week in advance. Make sure you allot enough time for the turkey to defrost.

Thanksgiving Cooking Tip

Balance the amount of dishes prepared ahead and those put together last minute – serve cold dishes made in advance as well as items straight from the stove.