Shrimp and Quinoa Grits

Shrimp and Quinoa Grits
Contributor
Shrimp and Quinoa Grits
Cut the Carbs!

Shrimp and Quinoa Grits

Shrimp cooked in bacon grease and bobbing across a lake of grits is about as Southern as y’all can get. These puddles of hominy are almost a kissing cousin of semolina and cornmeal and are the true definition of rib-sticking sustenance. Yet, if it’s treated with a little extra love and attention, you can get a similar squelching appeal (but lighter effect) from gussied-up quinoa. Gloss it with a little cream cheese for ooze and add in some lemon zest for lift. Cooking the quinoa in chicken stock will also help boost the flavors — though if you’re after an extra kick, try roasting the shells of your shrimp for 15 minutes in a moderate oven and infusing them in the warm chicken stock for 20 minutes. This may be a classic breakfast during a Southern summer when shrimp are in season, but I find it’s also a heartwarming dinner in winter — and a great way to revive any crustaceans you’ve stashed in the freezer.— Tori Haschka, Cut the Carbs!

2
Servings
934
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

Reprinted with permission from Cut the Carbs! By Tori Haschka, The Countryman Press 2015

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup quinoa, rinsed
  • 2 Cups chicken stock
  • 2 Tablespoons cream cheese
  • ½ lemon
  • 1 Tablespoon butter
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 red chile, finely chopped
  • 6 scallions, white and green bits finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 3 ounces (2 slices) smoked bacon, cut into small sticks
  • 1 Pound pound 2 ounces raw shrimp, peeled, and heads and digestive tracts removed (11 ounces peeled weight)
  • Piquant hot sauce, to serve (optional)

Directions

Put the quinoa and chicken stock in a saucepan and bring it to a boil, then reduce the heat. Simmer with the lid on until most of the liquid has been absorbed, 15 minutes. Stir in the cream cheese, and grate in the zest from the lemon half (and then set aside the lemon half). You want a slightly droopy consistency, so if it is too tight, add more cream cheese or a slosh of hot water.

While the quinoa cooks, put a large skillet over medium heat and add the butter, olive oil, half of the chile, white bits of the scallions, garlic, and bacon. Add the reserved lemon half, cut-side down, to the pan. Cook until the bacon begins to render its fat and take on some color. Add the shrimp and cook until they have turned nicely pink, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove them from the pan.

Squeeze the toasted lemon into the pan and scrape up any color that has clung to the bottom to create a rustic sauce. Serve the shrimp over the quinoa, topped with the bacon and pan juices. Top with the remaining chile, some piquant hot sauce, if you like, and a handful of the green bits from the scallions.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
44g
63%
Sugar
15g
17%
Saturated Fat
19g
79%
Cholesterol
71mg
24%
Carbohydrate, by difference
103g
79%
Protein
33g
72%
Vitamin A, RAE
95µg
14%
Vitamin B-12
1µg
42%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
5mg
7%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
1µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
70mg
7%
Choline, total
4mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
10g
40%
Folate, total
9µg
2%
Iron, Fe
3mg
17%
Magnesium, Mg
19mg
6%
Niacin
3mg
21%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
94mg
13%
Selenium, Se
11µg
20%
Sodium, Na
2869mg
100%
Water
328g
12%
Zinc, Zn
2mg
25%

Shrimp Shopping Tip

To save time, buy shrimp that has been cleaned and deveined.

Shrimp Cooking Tip

Leaving the tail on shrimp will add a richer flavor to your dish.

Shrimp Wine Pairing

Sweet chenin blanc, muscat, or amontillado sherry with nut-based desserts; sauternes or sweet German wines with pound cake, cheesecake, and other mildly sweet desserts; sweet chenin blanc or muscat or Alsatian vendange tardive (late harvest) wines with sweeter desserts; sweet chenin blanc or muscat or Alsatian vendange tardive (late harvest) wines, port, madeira, late-harvest zinfandel, or cabernet sauvignon or cabernet franc with chocolate desserts.