Saffron Shrimp Pasta

Quick and easy, this saffron shrimp pasta dish is just a bit spicy and plenty creamy

The name sounds fancy, but this saffron shrimp pasta can be made for any meal and any occaision. Feel free to substitute any pasta you have available too!

This recipe comes courtesy of HomeFarmer.com.

6
Servings
270
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Pound pappardelle pasta (or any other pasta)
  • 2 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Onion, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 Teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 Pinches of saffron threads
  • 2 Pounds raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 6 Roma tomatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 Cup whipping cream
  • 1/4 Cup white wine
  • 1/4 Cup chicken stock
  • 1 Cup fresh basil, chopped
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh Italian parsley, chopped
  • 1/3 Cup Parmesan shavings

Directions

Start a large pot of water on high heat for boiling the pasta.

Meanwhile, heat a large saute pan on medium-high heat.

Add olive oil, garlic, onions, tomatoes, and bell pepper. Cook until onions are translucent (2-3 mins).

Turn heat up to high, add shrimp, and saute for 2-3 mins.

While shrimp is cooking, add saffron and red pepper flakes.

Once shrimp is cooked, remove with tongs and set aside.

Reduce heat and deglaze pan with white wine.

Once reduced, add the cream and chicken stock and simmer on low heat for 10 mins.

Serve hot and garnish with fresh herbs and shaved Parmesan cheese.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
14g
20%
Sugar
19g
21%
Saturated Fat
8g
33%
Cholesterol
28mg
9%
Carbohydrate, by difference
29g
22%
Protein
7g
15%
Vitamin A, RAE
198µg
28%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
20mg
27%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
225µg
100%
Calcium, Ca
150mg
15%
Choline, total
16mg
4%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Fluoride, F
18µg
1%
Folate, total
38µg
10%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
42mg
13%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
2mg
14%
Phosphorus, P
101mg
14%
Selenium, Se
5µg
9%
Sodium, Na
270mg
18%
Water
210g
8%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Saffron Shopping Tip

Spices and dried herbs have a shelf life too, and lose potency over time. The rule of thumb is, if your spices are over two years old, it's time to buy some new ones.

Saffron Cooking Tip

Toasting whole spices before using them intensifies their aroma and flavor.