Negroni Pork Shoulder Taco Recipe

Negroni Pork Shoulder Taco Recipe
Staff Writer
Courtesy of Tango & Stache.

Negroni pork shoulder taco

This is as much Campari as you can get into one taco: a Negroni-marinated pork shoulder taco, served on a homemade bacon fat tortilla with a smoked orange marmalade. The recipe comes from Tango & Stache, a pop-up culinary experience in San Francisco.

8
Servings
524
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the pork shoulder

  • 1 pork shoulder (bone in)
  • 4 yellow onions, quartered
  • 4 oranges, quartered
  • 1 quart orange juice
  • 1 bottle Campari
  • 1 bottle gin

For the bacon fat tortillas

  • 1 Cup masa harina
  • 1 Tablespoon bacon fat or lard (use olive oil for vegetarians)
  • 3/4 Cups water
  • Big pinch of salt

For the smoked orange marmalade

  • 2 Pounds oranges (whatever your favorite is)
  • 2 Pounds Fresno peppers
  • 2 Cups sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • Splash of gin

Directions

For the pork shoulder

First, season meat liberally with the salt and pepper. In a bowl combine all of the ingredients together, making a giant Negroni, with a few extra ingredients. Let this marinate for 24 hours.

Remove from marinade, and be sure to reserve all the liquid. Smoke the meat over mesquite and cherry wood for 14-16 hours (you will not be cooking all the way through, as it will finish in the oven). Remove meat from the smoker and place it in a deep Dutch oven, roasting pan, or other large heavy pot with a tight-fitting lid.

Add the reserved Negroni liquid back to the meat, and slowly braise the meat in a 275-degree oven for another 12 hours.

For the bacon fat tortillas

Mix ingredients in a large bowl until dough forms. Take a Ping-Pong ball size of dough from bowl and press dough by hand, or use a tortilla press. 

Fry tortilla on medium-high in cast-iron skillet until golden and puffy.

For the smoked orange marmalade

While the smoker is still going with the pork shoulder, take 2/3 of the oranges and the peppers and put them on the smoker. Smoke until they are soft and cooked all the way through (approximately 4 hours).

Meanwhile, with a mandoline or very sharp knife, slice the remaining oranges and peppers into 1/4-inch slices (leave skin, but remove and discard all the orange seeds). When the fruit on the smoker is done, remove, and slice the same way, taking care to remove the seeds from the oranges.

Combine all the ingredients, save for the gin, and cover with water. Bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer. Slowly stir and cooking for hours until you have a thick, viscous pot of not quite sweet but deliciously hot and aromatic marmalade. Can the marmalade if you desire, otherwise let it cool.

Right before serving add a splash of the gin to the marmalade to brighten it.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
18g
26%
Sugar
11g
12%
Saturated Fat
3g
13%
Carbohydrate, by difference
88g
68%
Protein
8g
17%
Vitamin A, RAE
50µg
7%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
70mg
93%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
3µg
3%
Calcium, Ca
100mg
10%
Choline, total
13mg
3%
Fiber, total dietary
12g
48%
Folate, total
154µg
39%
Iron, Fe
5mg
28%
Magnesium, Mg
71mg
22%
Niacin
5mg
36%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
178mg
25%
Selenium, Se
8µg
15%
Sodium, Na
439mg
29%
Thiamin
1mg
91%
Water
205g
8%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Pork Shopping Tip

Bone-in cuts tend to be slightly less expensive than their boneless counterparts, and have more flavor.

Pork Cooking Tip

According to the USDA, the recommended internal temperature for cooked pork should be 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

Pork Wine Pairing

Tempranillo, dolcetto, gewürztraminer, or muscat with roast pork; carmènere with  pork sausage; sangiovese, pinotage, or richer sauvignon blancs for stir-fried or braised pork dishes or pork in various sauces; syrah/shiraz, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nero d'avola, or primitivo with barbecued spareribs or pulled pork, or with cochinito en pibil and other Mexican-spiced pork dishes.