Lamb Bacon Benedict With Duck Hollandaise

Try this lamb bacon benedict with duck hollandaise recipe perfect for any Spring occasion
Staff Writer
lamb bacon

Marc Murphy

Try this lamb bacon benedict with duck hollandaise recipe perfect for any spring occasion.

I make my own lamb bacon in this recipe, which takes 36 hours, but it’s an ingredient that is available from some specialty markets now. Feel free to purchase it, our recipe will yield roughly 20 pieces once sliced, if you’re feeling ambitious and have a lot of people coming over, take the challenge and make your own. It’s fun! — Marc Murphy 

3
Servings
1918
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the lamb bacon:

  • 2 Tablespoons pink salt
  • 1/2 Cup kosher salt, plus 2 tablespoons
  • 1/3 Cup packed light brown sugar
  • 8 sprigs of thyme
  • 8 bay leaves
  • 2 Tablespoons black pepper, freshly ground
  • 6 Pounds lamb belly, deboned (or source ready-made lamb bacon, 6 slices)
  • 2 quarts applewood, or preferred wood chips

For the hollandaise:

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 Teaspoon water
  • 1/4 Teaspoon sugar
  • 12 Tablespoons rendered duck fat or (1 ½ sticks unsalted butter), chilled and cut into small pieces
  • 1/2 Teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 Teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/8 Teaspoon Aleppo pepper or cayenne pepper

For the eggs benedict:

  • 3 English muffins, fork split (1 per person)
  • 6 extra large eggs
  • 1 Tablespoon white distilled vinegar

Directions

For the lamb bacon:

Bring all wet cure ingredients (pink salt, salt, sugar, thyme, bay leaves, and black pepper) to boil with 3 quarts of cold water, then cool down with 1 quart of ice. Once cold, pour cure over the lamb breasts and cover. Place the breasts in refrigerator for 24 hours.

Take breasts out of cure and let dry on a sheet pan in refrigerator for at least 16 hours. 

Start smoker and add your applewood chips; smoke for 2 hours or until internal temperature reaches 180 degrees F.

Place the smoked breasts on a cooling rack in refrigerator until chilled. 

Cut bacon into 1/4-inch thick strips, about as thick as an eraser on a pencil and place on a baking sheet lined with oil. 

Bake at 350 degrees F for 12 minutes or until crispy and golden. 

For the hollandaise:

Place egg yolks and water in a medium mixing bowl and whisk until mixture lightens in color, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Add the sugar and whisk for another 30 seconds.

Place a bowl containing the mixture over the simmering water and whisk constantly for 3 to 5 minutes, or until there is a clear line that is drawn in the mixture when you pull your whisk through, or the mixture coats the back of a spoon.

Remove the bowl from over the pan and gradually add the duck fat. If using butter add 1 piece at a time, and whisk until all of the butter is incorporated. Place the bowl back over the simmering water occasionally so that it will be warm enough to melt the butter. Add salt, lemon juice, and pepper of choice. Reserve.

For the eggs benedict:

Toast English muffins in toaster set on high setting being careful not to burn it (about 4 minutes).

In a large pot of boiling water, add vinegar and carefully poach each of the eggs.

Place desired amount of bacon on the toasted portion of muffin (top and bottom facing upward), top each with a poached egg and drizzle of hollandaise. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
106g
100%
Sugar
16g
18%
Saturated Fat
41g
100%
Cholesterol
650mg
100%
Carbohydrate, by difference
32g
25%
Protein
213g
100%
Vitamin A, RAE
87µg
12%
Vitamin B-12
10µg
100%
Vitamin B-6
2mg
100%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
18mg
24%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
8µg
9%
Calcium, Ca
121mg
12%
Choline, total
7mg
2%
Copper, Cu
1mg
0%
Fiber, total dietary
4g
16%
Fluoride, F
10µg
0%
Folate, total
123µg
31%
Iron, Fe
18mg
100%
Magnesium, Mg
163mg
51%
Niacin
36mg
100%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
1212mg
100%
Riboflavin
2mg
100%
Selenium, Se
63µg
100%
Sodium, Na
819mg
55%
Thiamin
1mg
91%
Vitamin D (D2 + D3)
1µg
7%
Water
705g
26%
Zinc, Zn
32mg
100%

Lamb Shopping Tip

Look for meat that is bright red. Red meat turns paler as the hemoglobin within releases oxygen – a sign that the meat has been sitting too long at the butcher's counter.

Lamb Cooking Tip

When browning meat, resist the urge to move the meat – you must allow a flavorful crust to form over high heat. Once it has formed, the meat should slide freely with the shake of a pan.

Lamb Wine Pairing

Most red wines, especially cabernet sauvignon, but also including cabernet franc, mourvèdre, Rhône blends, zinfandel, petite sirah, nebbiolo, nero d'avola, primitivo, barbera, and sangiovese.