Hearty All Butter Whole-Wheat Pie Crust

This pie crust recipe primarily uses whole-wheat flour, but includes a small addition of spelt flour for depth
Whole-Wheat Pie Crust

Rachael Pack

Pie crust is by far my favorite thing to make in the kitchen. First things first, I am an advocate for good fat and a high-quality, organic, grass-fed butter devotee.  Good butter truly makes all the difference when baking. Beyond its health benefits, the flavor of good butter can make even the most novice bakers look good. 

This recipe primary uses whole-wheat flour but includes a small additional of spelt flour for flavor and depth. If you don't have spelt, you can simply add in a 1/2 cup more all-purpose or whole-wheat flour in its stead.

The trick with pie crust is to keep everything cold; you don’t want the heat from your hands to melt the butter. Instead, you want the cold butter lovingly layered into the flour so your pie crust bakes up flaky.  

Next, unless you are using a food processor, I recommend using your hands to form the dough. Feeling the moisture content makes all the difference in making the perfect crust. However, if you do add too much water, simply throw in a bit more flour to balance it out again. 

Lastly, when your dough is finished, shape into flat, round discs; this will make it much easier to roll out. 

 

 

6
Servings
211
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks butter
  • 1/2 Cup all-purpose white flour
  • 1 1/2 Cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1/2 Cup spelt flour
  • 1/2 Tablespoon salt
  • 1/2 Teaspoon raw sugar (optional for sweet pies)
  • ice water, about 1 tablespoon

Directions

Gather the diced butter in a medium bowl and place in freezer for 10 minutes. In another bowl, combine all flours, salt and sugar (if using) and set aside.

When butter is sufficiently chilled, place the entire flour mixture on top of the chilled butter, and with a fork, a pastry cutter, or your hands begin to work them together. Continue this until the butter is reduced to very small pieces and the mixture looks “sandy.”

Next, begin with a tablespoon of water at a time and stir in the water just until there is no longer any dry flour. The dough should not feel wet. Press the dough together with your hands and shape into two flat round discs. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes for up to 1 day.  Dough can also be frozen for 1 week. 

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
4g
6%
Sugar
4g
4%
Carbohydrate, by difference
39g
30%
Protein
5g
11%
Vitamin A, RAE
2µg
0%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
1mg
1%
Calcium, Ca
17mg
2%
Choline, total
5mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
2g
8%
Folate, total
35µg
9%
Iron, Fe
2mg
11%
Magnesium, Mg
29mg
9%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Phosphorus, P
114mg
16%
Selenium, Se
10µg
18%
Sodium, Na
80mg
5%
Water
36g
1%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Butter Shopping Tip

Be sure to purchase the correct flour a recipe calls for – flours differ in gluten or protein content, making each suited for specific tasks.

Butter Cooking Tip

Insert a toothpick into the center of cakes, bar cookies, and quick breads to test for doneness – it should come out clean or only have a few crumbs clinging to it.