Dr. Klaw's Lobster Roll

Dr. Klaw's Lobster Roll
Staff Writer
Gabriela Herman

There is nothing fancy about lobster rolls; they were invented on the side of the road. I think my secret is steaming the lobster in a salty bath and never tossing out the lobster liquids that are in the shells. Save every last drop. That liquid is like lobster extract . . . or lobster flavor on steroids. Trust Dr. Klaw on this one.

Click here to read how to Make the Ultimate Lobster Roll

6
Servings
176
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 1 large onion, halved
  • 2 Tablespoons coarse sea salt
  • 4 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 Teaspoon black peppercorns, cracked
  • 4 lobsters, 1 1/2 pounds each
  • 8 Tablespoons salted butter
  • 1 Teaspoon garlic powder
  • 6 top-sliced hot dog rolls
  • 2 Tablespoons mayonnaise
  • Fine sea salt, to taste
  • Old Bay Seasoning, to taste

Directions

In a large clam or lobster pot, add 2 inches of water. Put in the onion halves cut sides down and add the coarse sea salt, garlic, bay leaves, and black peppercorns. Bring to a boil over high heat.

Put in the lobsters head up, the first 2 sitting on the onion halves, and loosely stack the other 2 lobsters, making sure all the lobsters are evenly spaced apart. Cover and cook over medium-high heat until bright red all over, about 6 minutes. They will be a little undercooked for a reason!

Transfer the lobsters to a large rimmed baking sheet and let cool. Work over the sheet to collect all the lobster juices and fat. Twist the tails and the claws from the bodies. Pull off the tail ends or flippers from the tail shells and push the tail meat out of the shells with your thumb. Cut down the top of the tails and discard the dark vein. Twist the knuckles from the claws. Cover the claws with a kitchen towel and with a mallet or the back of a large knife, gently crack the claws on both sides to loosen the shells from the meat. Break the shell off of the claws and pull out the claws, preferably each in one piece. Break up the knuckles and push out the meat.

Cut the tails down the center and give all of the lobster meat just a few chops; the meat should be in nice chunks. You should have about 5 cups of meat. Put the meat and all of the collected juices in a large skillet and set aside.

Now heat a griddle. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, melt the butter with the garlic powder and stir. Open the hot dog buns and brush only the insides with some of the garlic butter. Toast the buns on the hot griddle on medium-high heat until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes per side. Reduce the heat to medium if the griddle gets too hot.

Very gently reheat the lobster meat over low heat until barely hot. Remove the skillet from the heat, stir in the mayonnaise, and season with fine sea salt. Pack the lobster meat into the toasted buns and drizzle each with a little more of the garlic butter. Sprinkle with Old Bay seasoning and serve right away. You should have a nice pink-orange sauce developing around the meat as a result of the mayo and lobster juice cooking just a bit.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
18g
26%
Saturated Fat
12g
50%
Cholesterol
45mg
15%
Carbohydrate, by difference
2g
2%
Protein
1g
2%
Vitamin A, RAE
137µg
20%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
2µg
2%
Calcium, Ca
9mg
1%
Choline, total
7mg
2%
Fiber, total dietary
1g
4%
Fluoride, F
1µg
0%
Folate, total
2µg
1%
Magnesium, Mg
2mg
1%
Phosphorus, P
15mg
2%
Selenium, Se
1µg
2%
Sodium, Na
212mg
14%
Water
6g
0%

Lobster Roll Shopping Tip

Seafood shopping is quite easy in the general sense. Rule of thumb: if it smells fishy, don't buy. Fresh seafood should smell mild and more like the ocean and sea water rather than fish.

Lobster Roll Cooking Tip

When boiling lobster, add some fresh lemon wedges, a bay leaf, and black peppercorns in the water to develop another layer of flavor.

Lobster Roll Wine Pairing

Most white wines (especially albariño) and rosé with most fish dishes. Muscadet, sancerre, or New Zealand sauvignon blanc with cold fish dishes; chardonnay, pinot gris/grigio, or pinot blanc with grilled or roasted fish; sauvignon blanc or gewürztraminer with baked fish; grüner veltliner with fish pâté; vintage or non-vintage champagne or sparkling wine with light fish dishes; fino or manzanilla with small fried fish; junmai, junmai-ginjo, or junmai-daiginjo with teriyaki fish.