Dosant

Dosant
Staff Writer
Emily Jacobs

One man's cronut is another woman's dosant, apparently. With all of the hype surrounding the cronut recently, The Daily Meal spoke with chef Alina Eisenhauer about her "French donut" creation that she's been serving since 2008. And here's the recipe.

Click here to read about Chef Alina Eisenhauer

12
Servings
373
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

For the dough

  • 2 Cups warm milk
  • 1/4 Cup granulated sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon salt
  • 2 Tablespoons instant (rapid rise) yeast
  • 5 1/4 Cups unbleached, all-purpose flour
  • 3 sticks butter, cold
  • 1 egg, beaten with 1 tablespoon of water
  • 1 1/4 bars good-quality dark chocolate

Directions

For the dough

Combine all of the ingredients except for the butter in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Mix on low speed for 2 minutes, scraping the sides of the mixing bowl once if necessary. Mix on medium speed for 4 minutes. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured cookie sheet. Lightly flour the top of the dough and wrap well with plastic so it doesn’t dry out. Refrigerate overnight.

The next day, cut the cold butter lengthwise into ½-inch-thick slabs. Arrange the pieces on a piece of parchment or waxed paper to form a 5½- to 6-inch square, cutting the butter crosswise as necessary to fit. Top with another piece of parchment or waxed paper. With a rolling pin, pound the butter with light, even strokes. As the pieces begin to adhere, use more force. Pound the butter until it’s about 8 inches square and then trim the edges of the butter. Put the trimmings on top of the square and pound them in lightly with the rolling pin. Refrigerate while you roll out the dough.

Unwrap and lay the dough on a lightly floured work surface. Roll into a 10-inch square. Brush excess flour off the dough. Remove the butter from the refrigerator — it should be pliable but cold. If not, refrigerate a bit longer. Unwrap and place the butter on the dough so that the points of the butter square are centered along the sides of the dough. Starting in one corner, fold one flap of dough over the butter toward you, stretching it slightly so that the point just reaches the center of the butter. Repeat with the other flaps. Then press the edges together to completely seal the butter inside the dough. (A complete seal ensures butter won’t escape.)

Lightly flour the top and bottom of the dough. With the rolling pin, firmly press the dough to elongate it slightly and then begin rolling instead of pressing, focusing on lengthening rather than widening the dough and keeping the edges straight.

Roll the dough until it’s 8 by 24 inches. If the ends lose their square shape, gently reshape the corners with your hands. Brush any flour off the dough. Pick up one short end of the dough and fold it back over the dough, leaving one-third of the other end of dough exposed. Brush the flour off and then fold the exposed dough over the folded side. Put the dough on a baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 45 minutes to relax and chill the dough.

Repeat the rolling and folding, this time rolling in the direction of the 2 open ends until the dough is about 8 by 24 inches. Starting with a short end, fold the dough in thirds again, brushing off excess flour and turning under any rounded edges or short ends with exposed or smeared layers. Cover and freeze for another 20 minutes.

Give the dough a third rolling and folding. Put the dough on the baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap, tucking the plastic under all four sides. Refrigerate overnight.

The next day, unwrap and lightly flour the top and bottom of the dough. With the rolling pin, "wake the dough up" by pressing firmly along its length — you don’t want to widen the dough but simply begin to lengthen it with these first strokes. Roll the dough into 12 (length wise across the top) by 16 inch rectangle. If the dough sticks as you roll, sprinkle with a little flour. Once the dough is about 1/2 to 2/3 of its final length, it may start to resist rolling and even shrink back. If this happens, fold the dough in thirds, cover, and refrigerate for about 10 minutes; then unfold the dough and finish rolling. Lift the dough an inch or so off the table at its midpoint and allow it to shrink from both sides — this helps prevent the dough from shrinking when it’s cut. Check that there’s enough excess dough on either end to allow you to trim the ends so they’re straight and the dough is 16 by 12. Trim the dough.

Lay a yardstick or tape measure lengthwise along the top of the dough. With a knife, mark the top of the dough at 3-inch intervals along the length (there will be 4 sections in all). Position the yardstick along the side of the dough (height wise). Mark at 4-inch intervals top to bottom (there will be 4 sections ton all). Cut the dough into pieces as marked.

Lightly brush the bottom half of each piece with egg wash. Place 3 squares of chocolate in the center of the bottom half of each piece of dough making sure that there is at least ¼-inch boarder on all sides. Fold each piece of dough over its chocolate and gently press the down on the edges.
Place the dosants on a parchment-lined baking sheet and lightly cover with a kitchen towel or plastic wrap. Set aside at room temperature (not above 75 degrees) and proof for 30 minutes or until puffed although not doubled in size.

Fry dosants in 350-degree canola oil for 4 minutes per side (golden brown).  Place dosants 3 at a time into a paper lunch sack, sprinkle with 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, close the bag, and shake to coat. Enjoy while still warm.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
2g
3%
Sugar
4g
4%
Saturated Fat
1g
4%
Cholesterol
3mg
1%
Carbohydrate, by difference
76g
58%
Protein
10g
22%
Vitamin A, RAE
16µg
2%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
1mg
1%
Calcium, Ca
101mg
10%
Choline, total
5mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
3g
12%
Folate, total
163µg
41%
Iron, Fe
5mg
28%
Magnesium, Mg
26mg
8%
Manganese, Mn
1mg
56%
Niacin
6mg
43%
Pantothenic acid
1mg
20%
Phosphorus, P
131mg
19%
Selenium, Se
31µg
56%
Sodium, Na
46mg
3%
Thiamin
1mg
91%
Water
39g
1%
Zinc, Zn
1mg
13%

Dosa Shopping Tip

Indian food is loaded with many herbs and spices. Make sure you have a stocked spice cabinet and a big appetite.

Dosa Cooking Tip

As delicious as Indian food is, the smells are strong and they linger. Make sure to have your stove vents running and a window open if you don't want your furniture to smell like spices for a week.