Beer-and-Mustard Pulled Turkey

Make this simple pulled turkey recipe in a pressure cooker and it’ll be ready to serve in under an hour. Serve the...
Contributor
Beer-and-Mustard Pulled Turkey
Tina Rupp

Beer-and-Mustard Pulled Turkey

Make this simple pulled turkey recipe in a pressure cooker and it’ll be ready to serve in under an hour. Serve the turkey, infused with mustard and beer, in a sandwich, or on tortillas for a Latin flair. Recipe courtesy of The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book.

4
Servings
53
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Notes

Cooking spice-rubbed turkey in beer, then mixing it into a simple barbecue sauce — what could be better? Turkey thighs make the best pulled turkey. The meat is moist and flavorful, even after an intense braise.

For more flavor, coat the thighs in the spice rub early in the day and set them, covered, on a plate in the fridge for up to 8 hours.

If you want some heat, add up to ½ teaspoon cayenne to the spice rub.

Rather than on buns, serve the pulled turkey like soft tacos in flour tortillas; top with some sour cream and pico de gallo.

Ingredients

  • 2 Teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1 Teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 Teaspoon salt
  • 1 Teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ Teaspoon garlic powder
  • 2 1 ¼- to 1 ½-pound bone-in turkey thighs, skin removed
  • 1 12-ounce bottle dark beer, preferably a porter
  • 2 Tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon whole-grain mustard
  • 1 Tablespoon canned tomato paste

Directions

Mix the coriander, dry mustard, salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a small bowl; rub the mixture over the thighs, coating them evenly and thoroughly.

Pour the beer into a 6-quart stovetop or electric pressure cooker; nestle the thighs into the beer. Lock the lid onto the pot.

STOVETOP: Set the pot over high heat and bring it to high pressure (15 psi). Once this pressure has been reached, reduce the heat as much as possible while maintaining this pressure. Cook for 30 minutes.

OR

ELECTRIC: Set the machine to cook at high pressure (9–11 psi). Set the machine’s timer to cook at high pressure for 45 minutes.

Use the quick-release method to drop the pot’s pressure to normal. Unlock and open the cooker. Transfer the thighs to a carving board; cool for a few minutes. Debone the meat and chop it into small bits.

Set the stovetop cooker over medium heat or turn the electric cooker to its browning function; bring the liquid inside to a simmer. Cook until reduced to about half its volume when you opened the pot in the previous step, about 4 minutes.

Stir in the brown sugar, vinegar, mustard, and tomato paste until smooth. Cook for 1 minute, stirring all the while. Add the chopped turkey, stir well, and set aside off the heat or unplugged for a couple of minutes to heat through.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
1g
1%
Sugar
3g
3%
Cholesterol
3mg
1%
Carbohydrate, by difference
9g
7%
Protein
2g
4%
Vitamin A, RAE
56µg
8%
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
1mg
1%
Vitamin K (phylloquinone)
1µg
1%
Calcium, Ca
29mg
3%
Choline, total
5mg
1%
Fiber, total dietary
1g
4%
Folate, total
16µg
4%
Iron, Fe
1mg
6%
Magnesium, Mg
13mg
4%
Niacin
1mg
7%
Phosphorus, P
42mg
6%
Selenium, Se
3µg
5%
Sodium, Na
64mg
4%
Water
16g
1%

Mustard Shopping Tip

Spices and dried herbs have a shelf life too, and lose potency over time. The rule of thumb is, if your spices are over two years old, it's time to buy some new ones.

Mustard Cooking Tip

Toasting whole spices before using them intensifies their aroma and flavor.