Mexican Pork Pozole

Mexican Pork Pozole
Ingrid Hoffmann

Pozole is a hominy-based stew usually made with pork shoulder. Set bowls of shredded cabbage, avocado, radishes, chopped cilantro, and lime wedges on the table so each person can flavor their pozole as they wish. Keep plenty of tortillas and Mexican beer on hand!

4
Servings
272
Calories Per Serving
Deliver Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 4 dried whole New Mexico chiles
  • 1 Cup boiling water
  • 2 Teaspoons peanut oil
  • 8 Ounces boneless pork loin chops, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 Teaspoons dried Mexican oregano
  • 4 Cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 31 Ounces reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • kosher salt
  • 1/2 Cup green cabbage, shredded
  • 1 Hass avocado, pitted, peeled, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 Cup radishes, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 Cup fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 2 limes quartered

Directions

Place the chiles in a heatproof medium bowl. Pour the boiling water over the chiles. Let stand until soft, about 30 minutes. Drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the liquid. Cut the chiles lengthwise in half and discard the stems and seeds. Transfer to a blender or food processor and purée with the reserved liquid. Transfer to a bowl and set aside.

Meanwhile, heat 1 teaspoon oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add the pork and cook, turning occasionally, until browned, about 5 minutes. Transfer the pork to a plate.

Add the remaining 1 teaspoon oil, onion, and garlic to the Dutch oven. Cook over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the chile paste and oregano and mix well.

Return the pork to the Dutch oven. Add the broth and hominy and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium low and cover. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the flavors are blended and the pozole thickens slightly, about 1 hour. Season with salt.

To serve, ladle the pozole into soup bowls. Allow each guest to top with cabbage, avocado, radishes, and cilantro, as desired, and serve lime wedges on the side for squeezing.

Mexican Shopping Tip

How hot is that chile pepper? Fresh peppers get hotter as they age; they will achieve a more reddish hue and sometimes develop streaks in the skin.

Mexican Cooking Tip

There are 60 varieties of chile peppers, many of which are used in Mexican cooking. Handle them with care. When handling the spicier kinds, gloves are recommended. Always wash your hands with soap and warm water before touching your eyes.

Mexican Wine Pairing

Tempranillo or other light Spanish red wine types with paella, even seafood paella. Various other wines depending on what rice is cooked with; see Pasta Recipes and other individual food types.

Nutritional Facts

Total Fat
14g
22%
Sugar
6g
N/A
Saturated Fat
3g
15%
Cholesterol
33mg
11%
Protein
21g
42%
Carbs
19g
6%
Vitamin A
32µg
4%
Vitamin B12
0.6µg
9.2%
Vitamin B6
0.8mg
41%
Vitamin C
89mg
100%
Vitamin D
0.3µg
0.1%
Vitamin E
2mg
10%
Vitamin K
30µg
38%
Calcium
94mg
9%
Fiber
6g
24%
Folate (food)
80µg
N/A
Folate equivalent (total)
80µg
20%
Iron
3mg
16%
Magnesium
51mg
13%
Monounsaturated
8g
N/A
Niacin (B3)
9mg
43%
Phosphorus
286mg
41%
Polyunsaturated
3g
N/A
Potassium
1126mg
32%
Riboflavin (B2)
0.3mg
19.2%
Sodium
1758mg
73%
Thiamin (B1)
0.5mg
30.3%
Zinc
2mg
13%

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