6 Reasons Sushi Is Not as Healthy as You Think Slideshow

Sushi might seem like a good choice for healthy eating, but wrapped within its blanket of nori is an unhealthy secret

It’s All About the Salt

It’s All About the Salt

shutterstock 

Whether we’re talking about using six packets of soy sauce or devouring a delicately fried spider roll, it’s easy to underestimate sushi’s sodium levels. Any sort of tempura roll will have its fair share of salt; some contain more than 1,000 milligrams, which is more than half of your recommended daily allowance of sodium.  

Sugar and Rice Make Everything Nice

Sushi rice’s distinct and delicious flavor is a culinary marvel. Is it the special grain? Is it the rice vinegar? Turns out the secret ingredient is a heaping spoonful of sugar. A typical sushi roll needs at least a cup of cooked rice and a tablespoon of sugar which adds an extra 200 calories to each roll. On top of the added sugar, the white refined sushi rice breaks down almost immediately into glucose, spiking your blood sugar.

Mercury Should Only Be in Your Thermometer

Mercury Should Only Be in Your Thermometer

thinkstock 

Popular fish like albacore tuna or swordfish can contain high levels of mercury. It is best to avoid eating these types of fish more than twice a week to avoid the possibility of mercury poisoning. Although the consumption of raw fish in general is ill-advised for pregnant women, fish high in mercury is especially dangerous, with even one serving potentially causing serious damage to the fetus. 

Frozen Not Fresh

Although frozen fish is not any worse for you, it’s still misleading. In order to preserve freshness, many types of fish need to be flash-frozen when the boat is still at sea. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the serving of raw fish, and actually requires that the fish be frozen before it is served in order to kill the pathogens. Though freezing can’t eliminate all organisms, it surely takes away from that perceived freshness. 

Calories in Your California Roll

Calories in Your California Roll

thinkstock 

Sushi rolls are not low-calorie dining fare. A typical six- to eight-piece California roll contains an estimated 361 calories. To put this into context, a typical McDonald’s burger contains only 250 calories. The more elaborate the roll, the more calories it contains; a tempura roll clocks in at 531 calories. 

Spicy Mayo

Spicy Mayo

shutterstock 

That spicy tuna roll might provide the perfect hint of chile, but at its core, it is a glob of mayonnaise. This secret sauce will almost triple the fat count of a standard tuna maki roll.