whole foods salad recall
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Whole Foods Salads Recalled for Salmonella and Listeria Concerns

Editor
The prepackaged salads may contain bad corn

Leafy greens are yet again the topic of a food poisoning scare. Approximately 940 pounds of ready-to-eat salads with chicken sold at Whole Foods are being recalled due to possible salmonella and listeria contamination. According to the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Safety Inspection Service, the prepackaged meals were made by Sacramento, California-based GH Foods and could contain a tainted corn ingredient.

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The following products are affected by this recall:

  • 9.75-ounce clear plastic clamshell packages containing “Santa Fe Style Salad With Chicken” and “best if sold by” dates from October 17, 2018, to October 18, 2018
  • 10-ounce clear plastic clamshell packages containing “365 by Whole Foods Market BBQ Style Chopped Salad With Chicken” and “best if sold by” dates from October 17, 2018, to October 20, 2018
  • Six-pound bagged kits containing “BBQ Style Salad With White Chicken” and “use by” dates from October 17, 2018, to October 22, 2018
  • Eight-ounce clear plastic clamshell packages containing “365 by Whole Foods Market Chicken Fajita Salad” and “best if sold by” dates from October 17, 2018, to October 20, 2018.


These items were produced on various dates from October 9, 2018, through October 13, 2018. All were shipped to retailers in California and bear the establishment number “EST. P-39994” inside the USDA mark of inspection. According to the USDA, there have been no confirmed illnesses in connection to this recall. Consumers worried about health issues should contact a medical provider at once. The Daily Meal has reached out to GH Foods and Whole Foods for comment.

whole foods salad recall

USDA


The consumption of food contaminated with salmonella could result in salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. Symptoms include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever that show 12 to 72 hours after eating poisoned food. This normally goes away after four to seven days, and most people recover without treatment.

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Similarly, food contaminated with listeria monocytogenes can cause listeriosis — a serious infection that primarily affects the elderly, those with weakened immune systems, pregnant women, and babies. Symptoms include fever, muscle aches, headaches, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, and convulsions “sometimes preceded by diarrhea and other gastrointestinal symptoms,” according to the USDA. This illness requires medical attention and can be treated with antibiotics. Here’s hoping you’re ahead of the game with news of this product recall and are able to avoid food poisoning in the first place.