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Perdue

Perdue’s Commitment to No Antibiotics Ever - Why That Matters to You

Contributor
Healthier chickens are happier chickens. Happier chickens taste better.

Moms always want what’s best for their families. They spend countless hours researching the safest vehicle for transporting that precious cargo, the best educational opportunities to set them up for bright futures, and the most nutritious foods to fill their bellies. If you’re focused on doing whatever you can to give your family an advantage, then Perdue should be at the top of your list at the grocery store.

Recent warnings that the routine use of antibiotics in animal agriculture can create strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have led some companies to promise future changes. Perdue started making those changes over a decade ago, leading the industry. Now, with over 100 NO ANTIBIOTICS EVER™ chicken products in the market, there are plentiful options for customers who share these concerns.

“We believe consumers are concerned about the use of all antibiotics, not just some. Through our No Antibiotics Ever chickens, we want to give them a choice that carries transparency and confidence,” said Chairman Jim Perdue in a press release issued last month.

Reducing reliance on antibiotics has other benefits, too. Bruce Stewart Brown, DVM, Perdue’s senior vice president of food safety, quality and live production, reports that conditions have improved in the raising of Perdue’s chickens, such that 96 percent of their flocks never need human antibiotics for treatment. Healthier chickens are happier chickens. Happier chickens taste better. It’s a win for everyone.

Interested in No Antibiotics Ever? Look for Perdue chicken sold in the PERDUE® SIMPLY SMART®, PERDUE® HARVESTLAND®, and PERDUE® PERFECT PORTIONS® lines.

Related Links
Perdue Eliminates Use of Antibiotics in Hatcheries Perdue Buys Specialty Meat Purveyor Niman RanchFDA Admits Use of Antibiotics on Animals is at All-Time HighFDA Warns Against Antibiotics in Food SupplyFDA: 70 Percent of Antibiotics Sold in US are Used in Livestock, and That Number Continues to Rise